The Microfabrication Core will be established to support the investigators in the Cancer Physics Center, specifically to provide resources for microfabrication and soft-lithography. The Core will mainly support Projects 2 and 3 in the Center. For example, adhesive micropatterned surfaces will be used to study the influence of geometry on motility. In another example, microfluidic-based devices will be fabricated to study the influence of steric forces, extracellular matrix, cell compliance, and adhesiveness on tumor cell migration. These experiments will provide new insight into the process of intravasation and extravasation. The core will be located at the Hopkins'Homewood campus in 600 sq. ft. of dedicated laboratory space. The Core will be managed and administered as a user facility with well established protocols for: scheduling, managing and maintaining equipment, training, providing oversight of users, and billing and cost recovery. Two post-doctoral associates will be responsible for the day-to-day operation, including fabrication of devices and platforms for researchers in the Center, the training of researchers in microfabrication, and the oversight of self-users in the facility.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center--Cooperative Agreements (U54)
Project #
3U54CA143868-05S1
Application #
8726934
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-SRLB-9)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-08-01
Budget End
2014-07-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$7,690
Indirect Cost
$2,634
Name
Johns Hopkins University
Department
Type
DUNS #
001910777
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21218
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