This subproject represents an estimate of the percentage of the CTSA funding that is being utilized for a broad area of research (AIDS research, pediatric research, or clinical trials). The Total Cost listed is only an estimate of the amount of CTSA infrastructure going towards this area of research, not direct funding provided by the NCRR grant to the subproject or subproject staff. DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The University of California, Davis (UC Davis) is requesting continued support for the Clinical and Translational Science Center (CTSC). Since its initiation, the UC Davis CTSC has been firmly established as a major local, regional, and national leader in transforming the clinical and translational research enterprise and has received enthusiastic support from throughout UC Davis. The CTSC has created an extensive community of partners, ranging from the UC Davis Health System, colleges and schools to local community partners, regional partners including the University of Nevada and national partners, and other CTSA sites. The CTSC has fostered a cadre of successful trainees that are well prepared for a career trajectory in clinical and translational research, built an extensive infrastructure to support trainees, investigators, and community partners, and emerged as a major contributor to national CTSA goals. At the end of the initial funding period, the UC Davis CTSC is an organization that is: (1) responsive and familiar to investigators;(2) flexible;(3) versatile;(4) well-linked to university leadership, to participating academic units, and to the community;and (5) actively reducing barriers and facilitating translation of research gains into medical practice. The key features of our program are: education programs focused on """"""""team science"""""""";flexible Infrastructure;extensive collaborations across UC Davis;and engagement of local, regional, and national partners. The CTSC has played major leadership roles in establishing the national CTSA Consortium, and has been a leader or collaborator on 15 CTSA supplemental awards. In the next grant period, the CTSC will focus on 3 goals firmly anchored in our institutional fabric, the community, and the CTSA Consortium: (1) Completion of a comprehensive service and resource toolset for the research community;(2) Education and training of a well prepared workforce of trainees, staff, and investigators;and (3) Ensuring translational research is advanced to improve human health across the lifespan. To realize these goals, the CTSC will remain under the continued leadership of Lars Berglund, MD, PhD, supported by a cadre of directors and associate directors overseeing individual CTSC programs, and guided by a comprehensive committee structure designed to firmly anchor the CTSC with Institutional leadership, faculty, trainees, the community, and the national CTSA Consortium.

Public Health Relevance

(provided by applicant): The UC Davis CTSC has established a strong training and infrastructure resource to support and promote health research. Through the CTSC, research findings relevant to health and disease are made available to health professionals and community members. In addition, the UC Davis CTSC is part of a national network to ensure a broad-based information exchange between scientists, health professionals, and community members.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
Type
Linked Specialized Center Cooperative Agreement (UL1)
Project #
2UL1RR024146-06
Application #
8365063
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRR1-CR-1 (01))
Project Start
2011-07-01
Project End
2012-06-30
Budget Start
2011-07-01
Budget End
2012-06-30
Support Year
6
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$73,665
Indirect Cost
Name
University of California Davis
Department
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
047120084
City
Davis
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
95618
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