Applying for our second CTSA, Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSl) remains avidly committed to involving the full spectrum of clinical ahd translational research (CTR) to meet the pnsmise of biomedical science, not only bench to bedside (T1"""""""") translation, crucial to having health impact, translation into effective clinical practice (""""""""T2""""""""), care delivery and public health (""""""""TS""""""""), and health policy ('T4""""""""). In 2008 we started Tufts CTSl building on prior CTR resources, services, and educational programs, we purposely selected partners that would leverage and complement each other's special assets. Our 38 strategically- chosen partners Include 12 Tufts University schools/research centers, ten Tufts hospitals, three academic institutions (Brandeis University, Northeastern University, RAND Corporation), eight community-based organizations, and five industry partners, an outstanding and synergistic resources, opportunities, and education across the T1-T4 spectrum. Described in our application's four sections are four aims that build on this platform:
AIM 1 : Strengthen Tufts CTSl overall by: 1) organizing and leading its partners in their commitment to this shared home for CTR;2) expanding efficient access for all partners to a full spectrum of high-quality resources in a way that promotes collaborative CTR across disciplines and institutionsjS) advancing the field of CTR through local and national leadership and development of novel methods;4) providing innovative and tai^eted education and training across the T1-4 spectmm. (Section I) AIM 2: Operationalize and implement the CTR home and its infra- stnjcture, sen/ices and programs, including its central office personnel, administrative and financial management systems, committees, and other necessary structures. (Section II) AIM 3: Sustain and grow innovative resources, services, and policies that support and promote collaborative, cross-disciplinary, full-spectrum translational research. (Section III) AIM 4: Develop and broaden the CTR workforce through education and training across the T1-T4 spectrum, with a specific focus on addressing translational gaps between bench to bedside and from bedside to widespread impact on health. (Section IV)

Public Health Relevance

(See Instmctions): Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute uses the entire spectrum of clinical and translational research (CTR) to help meet the promise and the public's needs of biomedical science.This includes bench """"""""to bedside (""""""""Tl"""""""") translation and crucially for having health impact, translation into effective clinical practice (""""""""T2""""""""), care delivery and public health (""""""""TS-), and health policy (?T4"""""""").

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)
Type
Linked Specialized Center Cooperative Agreement (UL1)
Project #
5UL1TR001064-02
Application #
8743322
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1-PTM-C (S2))
Program Officer
Wilde, David B
Project Start
2013-09-26
Project End
2018-04-30
Budget Start
2014-05-01
Budget End
2015-04-30
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$4,462,200
Indirect Cost
$971,261
Name
Tufts University
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
039318308
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02111
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