In this project funded by the Chemical Synthesis Program of the Chemistry Division, Professor Matthew Sigman of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Utah will explore the development of techniques to more efficiently optimize diverse enantioselective reactions. Classically, catalyst optimization has remained mainly empirical, wherein evaluation of a significant number of ligands, often structurally unrelated, is required to develop a mature chiral catalyst. To overcome this impediment, Professor Sigman will use modular ligands, which permit the introduction of systematic changes to the ligand structure, in combination with physical organic mechanistic tools (i.e., Hammett electronic parameters and Charton/Taft steric parameters) and design of experimental statistical approaches to facilitate catalyst design and optimization.

This work could lead to both new enantioselective catalysts for challenging, synthetically useful transformations and the development of new approaches for mechanistic analysis and catalyst optimization. Success in each of these areas will have an impact on any area of activity in which the synthesis of molecules and catalyst optimization is needed, such as the pharmaceutical, chemical, agricultural industries and their biological and chemical research activities. In addition, this project will provide training of students, from pre-undergraduate to post-doctoral, including those from groups historically underrepresented in the sciences.

Agency
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Institute
Division of Chemistry (CHE)
Application #
1110599
Program Officer
Tingyu Li
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2011-09-15
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$390,000
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Utah
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Salt Lake City
State
UT
Country
United States
Zip Code
84112