Now in its fourth year, the BUGCAT is a venue for algebra and topology graduate students in all stages of their research to present their work and meet other mathematicians with related research interests. It is a two-day conference on the Binghamton University campus. Participants will include graduate students at all levels, postdocs, and professors. Approximately 160 participants are expected, with about 110 of them traveling from outside of a 1 hour radius from Binghamton. The aim of the conference is to provide a comfortable environment for graduate students from a diversity of backgrounds and schools to share their research. Graduate students will have the priority for talk space. In addition, Gilbert Baumslag from the City University of New York and Robert Ghrist from the University of Pennsylvania will serve as keynote speakers at the conference. Participation from all areas of topology and algebra is encouraged.

The conference strives to strengthen the sense of academic community among mathematics graduate students. Besides giving exposure to the research of advanced graduate students, the conference is an invaluable opportunity for students who have not chosen a research area yet to explore what topics are currently being fruitfully studied. The faculty members who attend serve an essential role in both providing new ideas as well as probing the ideas of graduate students, suggesting ideas for future study, and encouraging students to meet and work with people interested in their areas of research. Graduate students who attend the BUGCAT are better equipped to find academic positions and continue research and collaboration. The conference also promotes diversity in the mathematical sciences, both by encouraging women and minorities to attend and by encouraging participation from a broad range of graduate programs. The conference organizing committee, all graduate students, is remarkably diverse in gender, ethnicity, and background, and hence is well positioned to encourage participation by women and minorities.

Project Report

is a venue for math graduate students specializing in algebra or topology to present their work and meet other mathematicians with related research interests. The aim of the conference is to provide an environment which graduate students share their research. Graduate students are given priority for talk space. In addition, there are two keynote speakers--one in algebra and one in topology. Researchers from all areas of topology and algebra are encouraged to participate. The conference focuses on strengthening the sense of academic community among mathematics graduate students. Besides giving exposure to the research of advanced graduate students, the conference is an invaluable opportunity for students who have not chosen a research area yet to explore what topics are currently being fruitfully studied. The attending faculty members serve an essential role in both providing new ideas as well as probing the ideas of graduate students, suggesting ideas for future study, and encouraging students to meet and work with people interested in their areas of research. Graduate students who attend the BUGCAT are better equipped to find academic positions and continue research and collaboration. The conference also promotes diversity in the mathematical sciences, both by encouraging women and minorities to attend and by encouraging participation from a broad range of graduate programs. The conference organizing committee, all graduate students, is remarkably diverse in gender, ethnicity, and background, and hence is well positioned to encourage participation by women and minorities. The fourth annual BUGCAT took place November 12th and 13th, 2011, on the Binghamton University campus and was supported by NSF Grant No. DMS1134983 as well as the Binghamton University Mathematical Sciences Department, and the Binghamton University Harpur College Visiting Speaker Fund. With 119 participants from 31 colleges and universities, the conference was a great success. There were thirty-two presentations at this 2-day conference, for which Gilbert Baumslag of The City College of the City University of New York and Robert Ghrist from the University of Pennsylvania were the keynote speakers. Over 87% of speakers were graduate students and approximately 28% of speakers were women.

Agency
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Institute
Division of Mathematical Sciences (DMS)
Type
Standard Grant (Standard)
Application #
1134983
Program Officer
Andrew D. Pollington
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2011-11-01
Budget End
2012-10-31
Support Year
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$14,963
Indirect Cost
Name
Suny at Binghamton
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Binghamton
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
13902