This subproject is one of many research subprojects utilizing the resources provided by a Center grant funded by NIH/NCRR. Primary support for the subproject and the subproject's principal investigator may have been provided by other sources, including other NIH sources. The Total Cost listed for the subproject likely represents the estimated amount of Center infrastructure utilized by the subproject, not direct funding provided by the NCRR grant to the subproject or subproject staff. The research support services sponsored by the RCMI program are the Molecular Biology Research Laboratory (MBRL), the Cell Culture Research Laboratory (CCRL) and the Scientific Imaging Center (SIC). We propose to add enhancements to an existing computer facility to make it capable of handling computational biology/bioinformatics calculations and data analysis. The RCMI support for these facilities will include (in addition to the equipment) 100% of the salary and fringe benefits for the RCMI Facilities Manager (for the MBRL, SIC, and CCRL), the MBRL Coordinator and Research Technician, and 20% of the salary for the manager of the computer facility. Other support will include a minimal supply allowance for each facility to purchase disposable supplies and gases, equipment purchases (as recommended by Center scientists), service contracts on equipment and an equipment repair allowance for service of instrumentation that is not under service contract. It is proposed that RCMI continue to support the three facilities highlighted above (MBRL, SIC and CCRL) for the next funding cycle. The facilities have contributed significantly to the enhancement of the biomedical research infrastructure at the University and to the research productivity of RCMI-affiliated scientists by providing equipment not available in an individual investigator's laboratory. These facilities have also provided training in state-of-the-art methodologies for scientists, staff and students. It is also proposed that RCMI support the enhancement of the computer facility to allow interested scientists to use it for computational biology/bioinformatics research.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
Type
Research Centers in Minority Institutions Award (G12)
Project #
5G12RR003062-25
Application #
8357121
Study Section
National Center for Research Resources Initial Review Group (RIRG)
Project Start
2011-07-01
Project End
2012-06-30
Budget Start
2011-07-01
Budget End
2012-06-30
Support Year
25
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$355,102
Indirect Cost
Name
Clark Atlanta University
Department
Biology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
065325177
City
Atlanta
State
GA
Country
United States
Zip Code
30314
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