This subproject is one of many research subprojects utilizing the resources provided by a Center grant funded by NIH/NCRR. The subproject and investigator (PI) may have received primary funding from another NIH source, and thus could be represented in other CRISP entries. The institution listed is for the Center, which is not necessarily the institution for the investigator. The effects of spaceflight on various physiological systems are clearly profound, and despite extensive research are incompletely understood. It is widely recognized, within both the space and scientific communities, that even short periods of exposure to microgravity can produce vestibular dysfunction, losses in muscle strength and function, and loss of orthostatic tolerance. Hence, there is a substantial amount of concern regarding the physiological deconditioning that might occur during longer duration spaceflights, for instance to Mars. Within this context, several countermeasures have been developed, but none appear to be completely effective. Therefore, a program priority of NASA's Biomedical Research and Countermeasures Program (NRA-03-OBPR-04) is to determine the potential usefulness of artificial gravity as a countermeasure, especially with respect to skeletal muscle atrophy and loss of muscle function. As Burton noted (15,16), the most obvious countermeasure to microgravity is a centrifuge, yet it has been the least explored. There are some obvious applications of artificial gravity as a countermeasure to microgravity. For instance, artificial gravity could be used to impose orthostatic challenges on the cardiovascular system, possibly preventing the loss of orthostatic tolerance that occurs as a result of microgravity. There are also some potential applications of artificial gravity in a microgravity environment that are not as obvious. As an example, artificial gravity/hypergravity in a microgravity environment could be used as a novel method of performing resistance training under high loading conditions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
Type
General Clinical Research Centers Program (M01)
Project #
5M01RR000827-34
Application #
7951036
Study Section
National Center for Research Resources Initial Review Group (RIRG)
Project Start
2008-12-01
Project End
2009-11-30
Budget Start
2008-12-01
Budget End
2009-11-30
Support Year
34
Fiscal Year
2009
Total Cost
$151,170
Indirect Cost
Name
University of California San Diego
Department
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
804355790
City
La Jolla
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
92093
Grams, Morgan E; Sang, Yingying; Ballew, Shoshana H et al. (2018) Predicting timing of clinical outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease and severely decreased glomerular filtration rate. Kidney Int 93:1442-1451
Lavigne, Katie M; Woodward, Todd S (2018) Hallucination- and speech-specific hypercoupling in frontotemporal auditory and language networks in schizophrenia using combined task-based fMRI data: An fBIRN study. Hum Brain Mapp 39:1582-1595
Milot, Marie-Hélène; Marchal-Crespo, Laura; Beaulieu, Louis-David et al. (2018) Neural circuits activated by error amplification and haptic guidance training techniques during performance of a timing-based motor task by healthy individuals. Exp Brain Res 236:3085-3099
Hsu, Simon; Rifkin, Dena E; Criqui, Michael H et al. (2018) Relationship of femoral artery ultrasound measures of atherosclerosis with chronic kidney disease. J Vasc Surg 67:1855-1863.e1
Inker, Lesley A; Grams, Morgan E; Levey, Andrew S et al. (2018) Relationship of Estimated GFR and Albuminuria to Concurrent Laboratory Abnormalities: An Individual Participant Data Meta-analysis in a Global Consortium. Am J Kidney Dis :
Egnot, Natalie Suder; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Criqui, Michael H et al. (2018) An exploratory factor analysis of inflammatory and coagulation markers associated with femoral artery atherosclerosis in the San Diego Population Study. Thromb Res 164:9-14
Juraschek, Stephen P; Miller 3rd, Edgar R; Appel, Lawrence J (2018) Orthostatic Hypotension and Symptoms in the AASK Trial. Am J Hypertens 31:665-671
Hamadani, Kambiz M; Howe, Jesse; Jensen, Madeleine K et al. (2017) An in vitro tag-and-modify protein sample generation method for single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer. J Biol Chem 292:15636-15648
Chen, Teresa K; Appel, Lawrence J; Grams, Morgan E et al. (2017) APOL1 Risk Variants and Cardiovascular Disease: Results From the AASK (African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension). Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 37:1765-1769
Juraschek, Stephen P; Appel, Lawrence J; Miller 3rd, Edgar R (2017) Metoprolol Increases Uric Acid and Risk of Gout in African Americans With Chronic Kidney Disease Attributed to Hypertension. Am J Hypertens 30:871-875

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