This subproject is one of many research subprojects utilizing theresources provided by a Center grant funded by NIH/NCRR. The subproject andinvestigator (PI) may have received primary funding from another NIH source,and thus could be represented in other CRISP entries. The institution listed isfor the Center, which is not necessarily the institution for the investigator.This study is sponsored by NIH/NCCAM. It is known that cranberry juice and powders are being used by the general public as alternative medication to treat urinary tract infections and for other purposes. Cranberry juice and powders contain large quantities of natural chemicals called flavanoids. One of the goals of this study is to determine the concentrations of flavanoids in blood and urine after a large serving of cranberry juice is ingested. Another goal is to determine if taking a cranberry powder will affect the breakdown and excretion (metabolism) of other prescription medications when cranberry powder is taken together with these medications.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
Type
General Clinical Research Centers Program (M01)
Project #
5M01RR001070-31
Application #
7719586
Study Section
National Center for Research Resources Initial Review Group (RIRG)
Project Start
2008-05-01
Project End
2009-04-30
Budget Start
2008-05-01
Budget End
2009-04-30
Support Year
31
Fiscal Year
2008
Total Cost
$32,937
Indirect Cost
Name
Medical University of South Carolina
Department
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
183710748
City
Charleston
State
SC
Country
United States
Zip Code
29425
Kelly, Clare B; Hookham, Michelle B; Yu, Jeremy Y et al. (2018) Subclinical First Trimester Renal Abnormalities Are Associated With Preeclampsia in Normoalbuminuric Women With Type 1 Diabetes. Diabetes Care 41:120-127
Putterman, Chaim; Pisetsky, David S; Petri, Michelle et al. (2018) The SLE-key test serological signature: new insights into the course of lupus. Rheumatology (Oxford) 57:1632-1640
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Kelly, Clare B; Hookham, Michelle B; Yu, Jeremy Y et al. (2018) Response to Comment on Kelly et al. Subclinical First Trimester Renal Abnormalities Are Associated With Preeclampsia in Normoalbuminuric Women With Type 1 Diabetes. Diabetes Care 2018;41:120-127. Diabetes Care 41:e102-e103
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Sen, Sarbattama; Penfield-Cyr, Annie; Hollis, Bruce W et al. (2017) Maternal Obesity, 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D Concentration, and Bone Density in Breastfeeding Dyads. J Pediatr 187:147-152.e1
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Wagner, C L; Baggerly, C; McDonnell, S et al. (2016) Post-hoc analysis of vitamin D status and reduced risk of preterm birth in two vitamin D pregnancy cohorts compared with South Carolina March of Dimes 2009-2011 rates. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 155:245-51
Hollis, Bruce W; Wagner, Carol L; Howard, Cynthia R et al. (2015) Maternal Versus Infant Vitamin D Supplementation During Lactation: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Pediatrics 136:625-34

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