Young adulthood is the developmental period when cigarette smoking becomes more entrenched, with dramatic increases in intensity occurring after age 18 (Hammond, 2005). In order for us to confinue to make gains in reducing rates of cigarette smoking, we need to address the problem of smoking among young adults. This project will use Ecological Momentary Assessments (EMA) to gather real-fime, naturalisfic self reports of young adults'daily experiences and smoking behavior to examine how the immediate situation (proximal context) in which smoking occurs, along with the individual's subjecfive reactions to those experiences, varies by smoking level and influences future smoking behavior. This proposed project builds on several of our compelling findings to date with our current program project. These findings include: a) Mood just prior to smoking differs significantly from random, background times, such that when adolescents smoke, they feel less posifive and more negafive than other fimes. b) Following smoking, adolescents experience a significant relief of negafive affect and boost in posifive affect, c) Importantly, this change in affect predicts smoking trajectory - adolescents who belong to the trajectory with the lowest level of use and who do not escalate in their smoking derived the least amount of posifive affecfive change following smoking;that is, these youth did not experience the """"""""boost"""""""" following smoking, d) Mood variability, and not just overall level of mood, may be important in predicfing escalafion. e) Adolescents experience subjective aspects of withdrawal and dependence, even at relafively low levels of smoking. And f) Conjoint alcohol use and smoking may diminish the subjecfive mood boosts from smoking, although social context may be an important moderator. As we follow participants into young adulthood and as their smoking progresses, we will focus specifically on affective prompts and consequences to smoking, tracking of withdrawal symptoms, including new measures of attenfion, craving, as well as safisfacfion with smoking, and the influence of alcohol and social contexts on smoking. This proposed project presents a unique opportunity to track and examine the development of dependence from adolescence through young adulthood. Thus, this project is well posifioned to make a unique contribution to our understanding of the development of smoking patterns and nicotine dependence.

Public Health Relevance

In order for us to confinue to make gains in reducing rates of cigarette smoking, we need to address the problem of smoking among young adults, the age group with the highest rates of smoking. This project will use Ecological Momentary Assessments (EMA) to gather real-time, naturalistic self-reports of young adults daily experiences and smoking behavior to examine how the immediate situafion (proximal context) in which smoking occurs, along with the individual's subjecfive reacfions to those experiences, varies by smoking level and influences future smoking behavior. This project presents a unique opportunity to track and examine the development of dependence from adolescence through young adulthood, and as such, should help in developing future intervenfions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
3P01CA098262-08S1
Application #
8546686
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-RPRB-7)
Project Start
2002-12-01
Project End
2014-07-31
Budget Start
2012-08-01
Budget End
2013-07-31
Support Year
8
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$168,307
Indirect Cost
$60,881
Name
University of Illinois at Chicago
Department
Type
DUNS #
098987217
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60612
Lin, Xiaolei; Mermelstein, Robin J; Hedeker, Donald (2018) A 3-level Bayesian mixed effects location scale model with an application to ecological momentary assessment data. Stat Med 37:2108-2119
Selya, Arielle S; Dierker, Lisa; Rose, Jennifer S et al. (2018) The Role of Nicotine Dependence in E-Cigarettes' Potential for Smoking Reduction. Nicotine Tob Res 20:1272-1277
Selya, Arielle S; Rose, Jennifer S; Dierker, Lisa et al. (2018) Evaluating the mutual pathways among electronic cigarette use, conventional smoking and nicotine dependence. Addiction 113:325-333
Selya, Arielle S; Cannon, Dale S; Weiss, Robert B et al. (2018) The role of nicotinic receptor genes (CHRN) in the pathways of prenatal tobacco exposure on smoking behavior among young adult light smokers. Addict Behav 84:231-237
Xie, Hui; Gao, Weihua; Xing, Baodong et al. (2018) Measuring the Impact of Nonignorable Missingness Using the R Package isni. Comput Methods Programs Biomed 164:207-220
Pugach, Oksana; Cannon, Dale S; Weiss, Robert B et al. (2017) Classification Tree Analysis as a Method for Uncovering Relations Between CHRNA5A3B4 and CHRNB3A6 in Predicting Smoking Progression in Adolescent Smokers. Nicotine Tob Res 19:410-416
Dierker, Lisa; Mendoza, William; Goodwin, Renee et al. (2017) Marijuana use disorder symptoms among recent onset marijuana users. Addict Behav 68:6-13
Piasecki, Thomas M; Trela, Constantine J; Mermelstein, Robin J (2017) Hangover Symptoms, Heavy Episodic Drinking, and Depression in Young Adults: A Cross-Lagged Analysis. J Stud Alcohol Drugs 78:580-587
Gorka, Stephanie M; Hedeker, Donald; Piasecki, Thomas M et al. (2017) Impact of alcohol use motives and internalizing symptoms on mood changes in response to drinking: An ecological momentary assessment investigation. Drug Alcohol Depend 173:31-38
Hedeker, Donald; Mermelstein, Robin J; Demirtas, Hakan et al. (2016) A Mixed-effects Location-Scale Model for Ordinal Questionnaire Data. Health Serv Outcomes Res Methodol 16:117-131

Showing the most recent 10 out of 86 publications