The Penn Center for Musculoskeletal Disorders (PCMD) will continue to enhance the research productivity of, and provide critical resources and programs to, investigators to address multidisciplinary research strategies for musculoskeletal problems. The overall goal of this Center is to promote cooperative interactions among investigators, accelerate and enrich the effectiveness and efficiency of ongoing research, foster new collaborations and new research, and ultimately, translate our research efforts into better and new therapies for musculoskeletal disorders. The central theme of the Center will continue to be Musculoskeletal Tissue Injury and Repair. This theme is broad (as it includes all musculoskeletal tissue types, such as bone, cartilage, disc, ligament, meniscus, muscle, and tendon), focused (as takes advantage of commonalities in approaches across tissue types), and clinically significant (as it fosters development of assays, procedures and knowledge in pre- clinical animal and human models of translational relevance). It is important to note that our PCMD is not a bone center nor is it a muscle center. Rather, it is truly a musculoskeletal center and has emerged as the recognized home for musculoskeletal research across the Penn campus and as a technical and intellectual resource for the broader Philadelphia musculoskeletal research community. Thus, the primary overall aims of this Center are to enhance and advance the research productivity of investigators in musculoskeletal tissue injury and repair by: 1) Providing innovation within critical resource core facilities in areas that cross disciplines, length scales, and hierarchies. These core facilities are CT Imaging, Biomechanics, and Histology, 2) Developing a pilot and feasibility grant program for investigators, with direct mentorship, whereby new approaches, ideas, and collaborations can be developed prior to seeking extramural funding, and 3) Developing educational and research enrichment programs spanning tissue types, research approaches, and paradigms, through which members can learn from national leaders and from each other. High quality musculoskeletal research is currently being conducted by many groups at Penn. While many bring sophisticated approaches to bear on musculoskeletal problems, few groups have the required expertise and facilities to perform high quality and specialized assays in their own labs. Furthermore, most investigators are not aware of approaches utilized, and results obtained, in other tissues that may have direct relevance on their research questions. Ultimately, close cooperation, communication, and collaboration among researchers across musculoskeletal tissue types and from a wide variety of disciplines will significantly enhance the research of our members. The Center will provide opportunities to integrate multi-disciplinary techniques to determine mechanisms for tissue function, injury, degeneration, repair, and regeneration, with the ultimate goal of advancing the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases and injuries of the musculoskeletal system.

Public Health Relevance

The Penn Center for Musculoskeletal Disorders will continue to enhance the research productivity of, and provide critical resources and programs to, investigators to address multidisciplinary research strategies for musculoskeletal problems. The overall goal of this Center is to promote cooperative interactions among investigators, accelerate and enrich the effectiveness and efficiency of ongoing research, foster new collaborations and new research, and ultimately, translate our research efforts into better and new therapies for musculoskeletal disorders within the theme of 'Musculoskeletal Tissue Injury and Repair'.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30AR069619-02
Application #
9281681
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAR1)
Program Officer
Washabaugh, Charles H
Project Start
2016-07-01
Project End
2021-06-30
Budget Start
2017-07-01
Budget End
2018-06-30
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2017
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Pennsylvania
Department
Orthopedics
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
042250712
City
Philadelphia
State
PA
Country
United States
Zip Code
19104
Tichy, Elisia D; Sidibe, David K; Greer, Christopher D et al. (2018) A robust Pax7EGFP mouse that enables the visualization of dynamic behaviors of muscle stem cells. Skelet Muscle 8:27
Piazza, Matthew; Peck, Sun H; Gullbrand, Sarah E et al. (2018) Quantitative MRI correlates with histological grade in a percutaneous needle injury mouse model of disc degeneration. J Orthop Res 36:2771-2779
Govindaraju, Priya; Todd, Leslie; Shetye, Snehal et al. (2018) CD44-dependent inflammation, fibrogenesis, and collagenolysis regulates extracellular matrix remodeling and tensile strength during cutaneous wound healing. Matrix Biol :
de Bakker, Chantal Mj; Li, Yihan; Zhao, Hongbo et al. (2018) Structural Adaptations in the Rat Tibia Bone Induced by Pregnancy and Lactation Confer Protective Effects Against Future Estrogen Deficiency. J Bone Miner Res 33:2165-2176
Freedman, Benjamin R; Rodriguez, Ashley B; Hillin, Cody D et al. (2018) Tendon healing affects the multiscale mechanical, structural and compositional response of tendon to quasi-static tensile loading. J R Soc Interface 15:
Kurio, Naito; Saunders, Cheri; Bechtold, Till E et al. (2018) Roles of Ihh signaling in chondroprogenitor function in postnatal condylar cartilage. Matrix Biol 67:15-31
Heo, Su-Jin; Szczesny, Spencer E; Kim, Dong Hwa et al. (2018) Expansion of mesenchymal stem cells on electrospun scaffolds maintains stemness, mechano-responsivity, and differentiation potential. J Orthop Res 36:808-815
Knight, M Noelle; Karuppaiah, Kannan; Lowe, Michele et al. (2018) R-spondin-2 is a Wnt agonist that regulates osteoblast activity and bone mass. Bone Res 6:24
Sierra, Luz-Jeannette; Brown, Amy G; Baril√°, Guillermo O et al. (2018) Colonization of the cervicovaginal space with Gardnerella vaginalis leads to local inflammation and cervical remodeling in pregnant mice. PLoS One 13:e0191524
Jia, Haoruo; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Wei, Yulong et al. (2018) Loading-Induced Reduction in Sclerostin as a Mechanism of Subchondral Bone Plate Sclerosis in Mouse Knee Joints During Late-Stage Osteoarthritis. Arthritis Rheumatol 70:230-241

Showing the most recent 10 out of 84 publications