The Genomics Shared Resource (GSR) is a broadly functioning, newly consolidated Resource that provides an integrated set of tools and services for genomic analysis. To address the concerns in the last summary statement, and based on discussions with the Shared Resource Directors and the Shared Resource Advisory Committee, the GSR consolidated genomics services (formerly housed in four shared resources) under the leadership of Dr. Inwin Gelman. This has created greater synergy and efficiency, yet maintains the staff which has a combined 70+ years in genomics, microarray and sequencing experience. The GSR has a broad base of users whose continued support is derived from strong customer relationships, rapid turnaround times and cost-effective full service options. Working closely with the Bioinformatics Resource, the GSR provides researchers with high-quality microarray, qPCR, next generation sequencing (NGS) and genotyping data in a format that is amenable to downstream analysis. As a result, the GSR user base has grown to include users from outside institutions. The GSR is unique in that it provides investigators full service offerings including access to RPCI Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) and shRNA libraries, SNP genotyping (targeted and global), methylation (targeted and global), copy number and expression (gene and miRNA), and Sanger and next generation sequencing. As an Exiqon Center of Excellence and beta test site for several industry leaders, the GSR provides researchers access to the latest technologies, methodologies and products. In 2009, the GSR implemented a LIMS in partnership with LabVantage to offer researchers on-line sample submission, workflow and sample tracking, and a system wide data repository for projects and requests. The Strategic Plan is to continue providing access to cutting-edge technologies that are vital for basic and translational cancer research. The GSR will continue to work closely with the CCSG leadership and members to provide a centralized, efficient approach of supporting genomic endeavors, while facilitating peer-reviewed funding, publications and recruitment efforts. Projected use of the facility is expected to continue to increase as researchers incorporate more large-scale NGS studies to identify novel cancer-associated genes, and perform the associated downstream validation and functional studies required. First priority for use is given to peer-review-funded RPCI CCSG members;second priority to non-peer-review- funded CCSG members;third priority to non-members and academic collaborators;and last priority to external users. During the reporting period, the Genomics Shared Resource has served 46 members from 6 research programs, with 53% utilization by CCSG members with peer reviewed funding. The CCSG support provides 5% of the overall proposed budget.

Public Health Relevance

The GSR provides high quality, cost effective genomic sen/ices to the individual researcher. The Resource is instrumental in enhanced peer-reviewed funding, publications and recruitment efforts. The impact on research is substantiated by a large user base and utilization by all six CCSG programs.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
2P30CA016056-37
Application #
8738383
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
1997-06-16
Project End
2019-04-30
Budget Start
2014-06-26
Budget End
2015-04-30
Support Year
37
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$175,616
Indirect Cost
$69,463
Name
Roswell Park Cancer Institute Corp
Department
Type
DUNS #
824771034
City
Buffalo
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
14263
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