Structural Biology Core Facility The Structural Biology Core is a 'super core'that provides an integrated platform of expertise, education, and infrastructure to make structural biology available as tools to LCCC researchers. The Core allows engaging in high-resolution studies using X-ray crystallography, multi-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or computational methods. The Core offers access to equipment for, and expert guidance of users through, all stages of structure determination projects: homology modeling, construct design, protein expression &purification, crystallization, structure determination, structure analysis, biophysical studies, molecular dynamics studies, presentation &publication. The utility of the available resources is demonstrated by numerous structural studies that contribute to the understanding of cancer-related processes at the atomic level and that can be used to develop potential new therapies through structure aided drug design. The Core is led by a team of highly experienced structural biologists with proven track records in cancer-related research In 2009, 32 LCCC members, all peer-reviewed accounted for 82% of total Core use.. With the recruitment of a director for the Core, Dr. Machius, in the summer of 2009, there has been a reorganization of the facilities, together with substantial renovations and equipment acquisition. As a result of the expanded services and increased demand, the number of projects is increasing sharply. Additional personnel are required to fulfill the needs of LCCC members. Renovations are currently underway to consolidate the Structural Biology facilities into contiguous space, providing a single point of access to resources and allowing for fighter integration of equipment and personnel. Also, an efficient interface is being formed between the Structural Biology Core and the Center for Integrative Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery (directed by Dr. Stephen Frye), which will establish a comprehensive pipeline available to LCCC members for the development of novel anti-cancer drugs based on insights gained from structural biology projects. For 2010, the LCCC requests $119,367, an increase of 29% for additional personnel). CCSG funds are projected to be 15% of operating costs.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA016086-38
Application #
8594158
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-12-01
Budget End
2014-11-30
Support Year
38
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$186,982
Indirect Cost
$66,183
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Type
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
Mayer, Deborah K; Landucci, Gina; Awoyinka, Lola et al. (2018) SurvivorCHESS to increase physical activity in colon cancer survivors: can we get them moving? J Cancer Surviv 12:82-94
Huo, Dezheng; Perou, Charles M; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I (2018) Reported Biologic Differences in Breast Cancer by Race Due to Disparities in Screening-Reply. JAMA Oncol 4:883-884
Howe, Chanelle J; Robinson, Whitney R (2018) Survival-related Selection Bias in Studies of Racial Health Disparities: The Importance of the Target Population and Study Design. Epidemiology 29:521-524
Byrne, James D; Yeh, Jen Jen; DeSimone, Joseph M (2018) Use of iontophoresis for the treatment of cancer. J Control Release 284:144-151
Wilkin, Timothy J; Chen, Huichao; Cespedes, Michelle S et al. (2018) A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of the Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults Aged 27 Years or Older: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol A5298. Clin Infect Dis 67:1339-1346
Siegel, Marni B; He, Xiaping; Hoadley, Katherine A et al. (2018) Integrated RNA and DNA sequencing reveals early drivers of metastatic breast cancer. J Clin Invest 128:1371-1383
Ubil, Eric; Caskey, Laura; Holtzhausen, Alisha et al. (2018) Tumor-secreted Pros1 inhibits macrophage M1 polarization to reduce antitumor immune response. J Clin Invest 128:2356-2369
Hamad, Ahmad; Iweala, Onyinye I; Henderson, Cory et al. (2018) Recurrent anaphylaxis during cardiac catheterization due to ethylene oxide. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 6:2148-2150
Ho, G-T; Aird, R E; Liu, B et al. (2018) MDR1 deficiency impairs mitochondrial homeostasis and promotes intestinal inflammation. Mucosal Immunol 11:120-130
Pearce, Oliver M T; Delaine-Smith, Robin M; Maniati, Eleni et al. (2018) Deconstruction of a Metastatic Tumor Microenvironment Reveals a Common Matrix Response in Human Cancers. Cancer Discov 8:304-319

Showing the most recent 10 out of 1525 publications