The overarching goals of the Cancer Cell Biology Program are: (i) to understand, at the molecular and cellular levels, mechanisms underlying tumor initiation, progression, metastasis and resistance to therapeutic treatment, and (ii) to identify and validate new targets for cancer therapy. Insight derived from these studies, when integrated with research and development from other programs, will provide targets and guidance for the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention of cancer. Toward these two goals, the Program faculty investigates various aspects of cancer cell biology, including growth factors and receptors; angiogenesis and vascular biology; apoptosis; cell cycle regulation; chromatin biochemistry and transcriptional regulation; cell microstructure and function; DNA replication and repair; metabolism; regulatory RNA; and signal transduction. Led by two co-leaders with complementary expertise, Yue Xiong and James Bear, the program organizes these different areas into four major research themes: (1) Cell Cycle, (2) Cell Signaling, (3) Cell Movement and Organization, and (4) Epigenetics and Chromatin Biology. The major emphasis of the Program is to foster integrated research that spans these inter-related themes, enhancing the research and translational capabilities of program investigators through the establishment, expansion and utilization of appropriate core facilities, and promoting interactions with investigators from other LCCC basic, clinical and population sciences programs. The Cancer Cell Biology Program consists of 45 members who are associated with 7 basic science and 4 clinical departments at UNC-Chapel Hill. During the last funding period, program members have published 644 cancer-related articles (30% collaborative). In 2014, our program members held 101 grants and $27.3M (total cost) in annual extramural funding, including 24 grants and $5.8M (total costs) from the NCI.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA016086-44
Application #
9834870
Study Section
Subcommittee I - Transistion to Independence (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2019-12-01
Budget End
2020-11-30
Support Year
44
Fiscal Year
2020
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Type
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
Shen, Hui; Shih, Juliann; Hollern, Daniel P et al. (2018) Integrated Molecular Characterization of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors. Cell Rep 23:3392-3406
Shao, Wenwei; Chen, Xiaojing; Samulski, Richard J et al. (2018) Inhibition of antigen presentation during AAV gene therapy using virus peptides. Hum Mol Genet 27:601-613
Gao, Yanzhe; Kardos, Jordan; Yang, Yang et al. (2018) The Cancer/Testes (CT) Antigen HORMAD1 promotes Homologous Recombinational DNA Repair and Radioresistance in Lung adenocarcinoma cells. Sci Rep 8:15304
Schaefer, Kristina N; Bonello, Teresa T; Zhang, Shiping et al. (2018) Supramolecular assembly of the beta-catenin destruction complex and the effect of Wnt signaling on its localization, molecular size, and activity in vivo. PLoS Genet 14:e1007339
Zuze, Takondwa; Painschab, Matthew S; Seguin, Ryan et al. (2018) Plasmablastic lymphoma in Malawi. Infect Agent Cancer 13:22
Wang, Jeremy R; Holt, James; McMillan, Leonard et al. (2018) FMLRC: Hybrid long read error correction using an FM-index. BMC Bioinformatics 19:50
Lee, Janie M; Abraham, Linn; Lam, Diana L et al. (2018) Cumulative Risk Distribution for Interval Invasive Second Breast Cancers After Negative Surveillance Mammography. J Clin Oncol 36:2070-2077
Thomas, Nancy E; Edmiston, Sharon N; Orlow, Irene et al. (2018) Inherited Genetic Variants Associated with Melanoma BRAF/NRAS Subtypes. J Invest Dermatol 138:2398-2404
Cousins, Emily M; Goldfarb, Dennis; Yan, Feng et al. (2018) Competitive Kinase Enrichment Proteomics Reveals that Abemaciclib Inhibits GSK3? and Activates WNT Signaling. Mol Cancer Res 16:333-344
Armstrong, Robin L; Penke, Taylor J R; Strahl, Brian D et al. (2018) Chromatin conformation and transcriptional activity are permissive regulators of DNA replication initiation in Drosophila. Genome Res 28:1688-1700

Showing the most recent 10 out of 1525 publications