CANCER CELL BIOLOGY PROGRAM The overarching goals of the Cancer Cell Biology (CCB) Program are: (i) to understand, at the molecular and cellular levels, mechanisms underlying tumor initiation, progression, metastasis and resistance to therapeutic treatment, and (ii) to identify and validate new targets for cancer therapy. Insight derived from these studies, when integrated with research and development from other programs, will provide targets and guidance for the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention of cancer. Toward these two goals, the Program faculty investigate various aspects of cancer cell biology, including growth factors and receptors; angiogenesis and vascular biology; apoptosis; cell cycle regulation; chromatin biochemistry and transcriptional regulation; cell microstructure and function; DNA replication and repair; metabolism; regulatory RNA; and signal transduction. Led by two co-leaders with complementary expertise, Yue Xiong and James Bear, the program organizes these different areas into four major research aims: (1) Cell Cycle, (2) Cell Signaling, (3) Cell Movement and Organization, and (4) Chromatin Biology. The major emphasis of the Program is to foster integrated research that spans these inter-related themes, enhancing the research and translational capabilities of program investigators through the establishment, expansion and utilization of appropriate core facilities, and promoting interactions with investigators from other LCCC basic, clinical and population sciences programs. CCB has made concerted and focused efforts to improve translational output, by fostering inter-programmatic collaboration directed towards translation of basic science discoveries, engaging in entrepreneurship and brining small molecule inhibitors to pre-clinical and clinical trials. The research of CCB addresses fundamental biology that applies to all cancers but has a particular impact on cancers relevant to our catchment area such as multiple myeloma, lung cancer and melanoma. In addition, members of CCB have been active in community outreach and engagement activities such as advising state legislators on e-cigarette regulation. Finally, the members of CCB are fully committed to education, training and mentoring at levels ranging from middle schoolers through junior faculty at our own institution. The Cancer Cell Biology Program consists of 43 members who are associated with 12 basic science and 3 clinical departments at UNC-Chapel Hill and affiliated institutions. During the last funding period, program members published 740 cancer-related articles. Of these, 23% were inter-programmatic and 10% were intra- programmatic (31% collaborative). In 2019, our program members held grants totaling $18.2M (direct cost) in cancer-relevant extramural funding, including $3.5M (direct costs) from the NCI and $13.6M other peer.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
2P30CA016086-45
Application #
10089811
Study Section
Subcommittee I - Transistion to Independence (NCI)
Project Start
1997-06-01
Project End
2025-11-30
Budget Start
2020-12-01
Budget End
2021-11-30
Support Year
45
Fiscal Year
2021
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Type
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
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