The Environmental and Molecular Carcinogenesis Program integrates 27 investigators (24 full members and 3 associate members) from several different departments on NYU campuses of Sterling Forest and the School of Medicine, sharing a common interest in understanding the Environmental causes of cancer. The overall goal of the Program is to understand the environmental etiology of cancer and to use this information for cancer prevention and early detection. The EMC Research Program focuses on the following goals: (1) Identifying the mechanisms of action for environmental carcinogens, with a strong focus on inorganic compounds, such as arsenic, nickel, chromium, and cadmium by investigating their effects on the structure and function of cellular macromolecules;(2) The formation of reactive oxygen species, their biochemistry, and the biological effects that might result from their cellular interactions;(3) The mutational specificity of carcinogens and the site-specific mutagenesis of particular DNA lesions, the molecular basis for genetic susceptibility to environmental agents, the effects of hormones on gene expression, carcinogenesis, and chemoprevention;and (4) Epigenetic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. To achieve these goals, research in this Program is divided thematically into four groups: 1) DNA adducts, DNA Damage and Repair;2) Carcinogenesis and Animal Models;3) Early Detection and Chemoprevention;and 4) Cell Signaling and Epigenetic Mechanisms of Carcinogenesis. Drs. Max Costa and William Rom are the Co-Leaders for this Program. Total funding decreased from $17,628,704 to $7,570,910 since the last competitive application. Membership has decreased from 47 to 28. Publications for the period total 323, of which 17% are intraprogrammatic, 16.1% are inter-programmatic, and 4% are both intra- and inter-programmatic collaborations.

Public Health Relevance

The Environmental and Molecular Carcinogenesis Program integrates investigators whose research aims to understand the environmental etiology of cancer and to use this information for cancer prevention and early detection, with the ultimate goal of reducing the risk of cancer occurrence and death and improving the quality of life of cancer survivors.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA016087-34
Application #
8765169
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-03-01
Budget End
2015-02-28
Support Year
34
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$14,613
Indirect Cost
$5,992
Name
New York University
Department
Type
DUNS #
121911077
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10016
Gong, Yixiao; Lazaris, Charalampos; Sakellaropoulos, Theodore et al. (2018) Stratification of TAD boundaries reveals preferential insulation of super-enhancers by strong boundaries. Nat Commun 9:542
Kirkling, Margaret E; Cytlak, Urszula; Lau, Colleen M et al. (2018) Notch Signaling Facilitates In Vitro Generation of Cross-Presenting Classical Dendritic Cells. Cell Rep 23:3658-3672.e6
Minton, Denise R; Nam, Minwoo; McLaughlin, Daniel J et al. (2018) Serine Catabolism by SHMT2 Is Required for Proper Mitochondrial Translation Initiation and Maintenance of Formylmethionyl-tRNAs. Mol Cell 69:610-621.e5
Hadi, Tarik; Boytard, Ludovic; Silvestro, Michele et al. (2018) Macrophage-derived netrin-1 promotes abdominal aortic aneurysm formation by activating MMP3 in vascular smooth muscle cells. Nat Commun 9:5022
Zhang, Yilong; Shao, Yongzhao (2018) Concordance measure and discriminatory accuracy in transformation cure models. Biostatistics 19:14-26
Lim, Chae Ho; Sun, Qi; Ratti, Karan et al. (2018) Hedgehog stimulates hair follicle neogenesis by creating inductive dermis during murine skin wound healing. Nat Commun 9:4903
Peled, Michael; Tocheva, Anna S; Sandigursky, Sabina et al. (2018) Affinity purification mass spectrometry analysis of PD-1 uncovers SAP as a new checkpoint inhibitor. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 115:E468-E477
Kistler, Kathryn E; Trcek, Tatjana; Hurd, Thomas R et al. (2018) Phase transitioned nuclear Oskar promotes cell division of Drosophila primordial germ cells. Elife 7:
Puranik, Amrutesh S; Leaf, Irina A; Jensen, Mark A et al. (2018) Kidney-resident macrophages promote a proangiogenic environment in the normal and chronically ischemic mouse kidney. Sci Rep 8:13948
Saint Fleur-Lominy, Shella; Maus, Mate; Vaeth, Martin et al. (2018) STIM1 and STIM2 Mediate Cancer-Induced Inflammation in T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Cell Rep 24:3045-3060.e5

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