As Cancer research continues to become increasingly data driven, many investigative studies underway at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey (CINJ) rely upon analysis of multi-dimensional data sets, high- resolution imaging, next generation sequencing and other information intensive technologies. The Biomedical Informatics shared resource (Bioinformatics) addresses these challenges through the use of high-throughput instrumentation, advanced data management systems, machine-learning technologies, high-performance cloud computing environments and state-of-the-art supercomputing capabilities. Under the direction of David J. Foran, PhD, the overarching mission of Bioinformatics is to provide leading- edge data acquisition and analysis tools, computational informatics expertise, data analysis, and intensive training to foster advances in research and discovery in investigative oncology. Application of these activities to genomic data from patient samples is enhancing patient care and initiating and sustaining productive collaborations among CINJ investigators and throughout the clinical and basic research community. To optimize the support we provide to our basic, clinical and population research programs Bioinformatics is organized into the following sections: Computational Imaging; Clinical and Research Information Technology (IT); Chemical Informatics and Drug Discovery; and Bioinformatics and Systems Biology.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA072720-22
Application #
10112857
Study Section
Subcommittee I - Transistion to Independence (NCI)
Project Start
1997-03-01
Project End
2024-02-29
Budget Start
2021-03-01
Budget End
2022-02-28
Support Year
22
Fiscal Year
2021
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Rbhs -Cancer Institute of New Jersey
Department
Type
DUNS #
078728091
City
New Brunswick
State
NJ
Country
United States
Zip Code
08901
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