The goal of the Cell Biology Core is to make available to members of the Yale DRC the instrumentation, technical personnel, and expertise for the analysis of cell function in areas of research related to diabetes. The Core focuses primarily on imaging techniques (both light and electron microscopy), and also offers quantitative infra-red imaging of gels and multiwall plates. Emphasis is given to immunocytochemical methods, and to the dynamic light microscopy imaging of living cells containing fluorescent markers, using standard epifluorescence, total internal reflection, and confocal (including spinning disk) techniques. In addition, the core offers leading edge techniques such as electron microscopy tomography and three different types of super-resolution microscopy (STED, FPALM, and SIM). DRC investigators will be trained in various imaging techniques as required for their work. It is anticipated that the services provided by the Core will permit the elucidation of wide-ranging aspects of cell function that are critical to understanding diabetes pathophysiology.

Public Health Relevance

Diabetes causes significant morbidity and mortality in the U.S. and wortdwide. The Cell Biology Core of the Yale DRC offers investigators the tools required to better understand the pathophysiology of all types of diabetes and their complications. As part of a multi-faceted effort, the advances that will be facilitated by this Core will lead to improved prevention and treatment of these conditions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30DK045735-22
Application #
8635341
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1-GRB-S)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-02-01
Budget End
2015-01-31
Support Year
22
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$95,571
Indirect Cost
$38,171
Name
Yale University
Department
Type
DUNS #
043207562
City
New Haven
State
CT
Country
United States
Zip Code
06520
Qiu, Yang; Perry, Rachel J; Camporez, João-Paulo G et al. (2018) In vivo studies on the mechanism of methylene cyclopropyl acetic acid and methylene cyclopropyl glycine-induced hypoglycemia. Biochem J 475:1063-1074
Perry, Rachel J; Peng, Liang; Cline, Gary W et al. (2018) Publisher Correction: Non-invasive assessment of hepatic mitochondrial metabolism by positional isotopomer NMR tracer analysis (PINTA). Nat Commun 9:498
Hu, Youjia; Peng, Jian; Li, Fangyong et al. (2018) Evaluation of different mucosal microbiota leads to gut microbiota-based prediction of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. Sci Rep 8:15451
Belfort-DeAguiar, Renata; Seo, Dongju (2018) Food Cues and Obesity: Overpowering Hormones and Energy Balance Regulation. Curr Obes Rep 7:122-129
Dong, Rui; Zhu, Ting; Benedetti, Lorena et al. (2018) The inositol 5-phosphatase INPP5K participates in the fine control of ER organization. J Cell Biol 217:3577-3592
Bian, Xin; Saheki, Yasunori; De Camilli, Pietro (2018) Ca2+ releases E-Syt1 autoinhibition to couple ER-plasma membrane tethering with lipid transport. EMBO J 37:219-234
Jelenik, Tomas; Flögel, Ulrich; Álvarez-Hernández, Elisa et al. (2018) Insulin Resistance and Vulnerability to Cardiac Ischemia. Diabetes 67:2695-2702
Barentine, Andrew E S; Schroeder, Lena K; Graff, Michael et al. (2018) Simultaneously Measuring Image Features and Resolution in Live-Cell STED Images. Biophys J 115:951-956
Goedeke, Leigh; Bates, Jamie; Vatner, Daniel F et al. (2018) Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Inhibition Reverses NAFLD and Hepatic Insulin Resistance but Promotes Hypertriglyceridemia in Rodents. Hepatology 68:2197-2211
Sherr, Jennifer L (2018) Closing the Loop on Managing Youth With Type 1 Diabetes: Children Are Not Just Small Adults. Diabetes Care 41:1572-1578

Showing the most recent 10 out of 620 publications