This subproject is one of many research subprojects utilizing theresources provided by a Center grant funded by NIH/NCRR. The subproject andinvestigator (PI) may have received primary funding from another NIH source,and thus could be represented in other CRISP entries. The institution listed isfor the Center, which is not necessarily the institution for the investigator.Polarity in networks and pathways is determined by the spatial organization, subcellular distribution, dynamic behavior, interactions and functions of specific molecules within the cell. Understanding the basis for polarity in networks and pathways will require development of new methods to measure concentrations, diffusion properties and interactions of molecules in cells, new ways to manipulate concentrations, locations and interactions of molecules in cells, and new strategies to model interactions of molecules in networks and pathways in different subcellular compartments. The Technology Center for Polarity in Networks and Pathways at the Center for Cell Analysis and Modeling (CCAM) integrates new microscope technologies for making quantitative in vivo live cell measurements with new physical formulations and computational tools that produce spatially realistic quantitative models of intracellular dynamics. Three core technology projects, Model, Measure and Manipulate, provide an integrated framework for elucidating spatiotemporal dynamics in living cells. Development of tools by the Technology Development Cores is motivated by a series of Driving Biological Projects (DBP) that cover major complex problems in cell biology. These DBPs all revolve around the ssue of how the cell controls the locations of its molecular components and how that polarity is used to optimize a cellular function. Advances in modeling approaches forumlated under this project are subsequently integrated into the Virtual Cell for dissemination to our user base.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
Type
Biotechnology Resource Grants (P41)
Project #
2P41RR013186-10
Application #
7602386
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-CB-L (40))
Project Start
2007-09-01
Project End
2008-07-31
Budget Start
2007-09-01
Budget End
2008-07-31
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2007
Total Cost
$53,279
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Connecticut
Department
Anatomy/Cell Biology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
022254226
City
Farmington
State
CT
Country
United States
Zip Code
06030
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Ditlev, Jonathon A; Mayer, Bruce J; Loew, Leslie M (2013) There is more than one way to model an elephant. Experiment-driven modeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Biophys J 104:520-32

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