The Career Development Research Program (CDP) of the University of Texas SPORE in Lung Cancer is an integral part of the overall Lung Cancer SPORE research. This Program provides, after selection by external review and applicant discussion with senior SPORE investigators, a flexible and nimble platform for seed funding to stimulate the careers of young investigators in lung cancer translational research. It is designed to fund promising young investigators that address important translational objectives in early detection, prevention, and therapy of lung cancer. Through institutional commitments at both UTSW and UTMDACC there are $300,000 in funds (that can be used for CDP or DRP Projects) matched to the $50,000 provided by the grant for the CDP. The CDP program has evolved into a highly structured process for solicitation, evaluation and mentorship, to attract new investigators to lung cancer translational research who have novel approaches and techniques that address significant barriers in lung cancer and who could benefit from SPORE Core Resources, interaction and mentorship, and that have potential to synergize with our existing Projects. The CDP has resulted in a large number of publications, new lung cancer translational scientists, and new peer reviewed grants.
The Specific Aims of this competing renewal Lung Cancer SPORE CDP application are to build on the current and past exemplary SPORE progress of training the next generation of lung cancer leaders to fuel discovery and innovation. They are summarized as follows: 1. To enhance the translational lung cancer research capability at UTSW and MDACC via recruitment of highly innovative and talented entry-level and junior scientists;2. To attract candidates with prior experience in cancer at other disease sites who want to acquire expertise in Lung cancer translational research;3. To transition CDP awardees from mentored to successful independent lung cancer translational research scientists;4. To promote the development of clinical oncologists and basic scientists who can rapidly translate basic observations in cell and molecular biology/genetics into clinically applicable utility. We are particularly interested in recruiting applied and basic clinicians, scientists, and physician-scientist candidates who: 1. Have the potential to bring new and innovative ideas and approaches to lung cancer research. 2. Are trained in biomedical concepts and technologies, data gathering, evaluation and interpretation. 3. Are expert or can be trained to use new approaches and techniques to detect and resolve weaknesses and gaps in our understanding of lung cancer biology, pathogenesis, and treatment.

Public Health Relevance

Over the last 20 years, the 5-year survival rate for lung cancer has improved only by 2%, from 13 percent to 15 percent. That statistics alone is an urgent call for accelerated translational lung cancer research. The primary objective of the University of Texas Lung Cancer SPORE CDP is to provide a source of seed funding to stimulate the careers and mentor young lung cancer translational investigators to be the next generation of researchers.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
2P50CA070907-16A1
Application #
8747093
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-RPRB-C (M1))
Project Start
1996-09-30
Project End
2019-08-31
Budget Start
2014-09-23
Budget End
2015-08-31
Support Year
16
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$76,649
Indirect Cost
$15,359
Name
University of Texas Sw Medical Center Dallas
Department
Type
DUNS #
800771545
City
Dallas
State
TX
Country
United States
Zip Code
75390
Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Goldberg, Michael E; Greenawalt, Danielle M et al. (2018) STK11/LKB1 Mutations and PD-1 Inhibitor Resistance in KRAS-Mutant Lung Adenocarcinoma. Cancer Discov 8:822-835
Walser, Tonya C; Jing, Zhe; Tran, Linh M et al. (2018) Silencing the Snail-Dependent RNA Splice Regulator ESRP1 Drives Malignant Transformation of Human Pulmonary Epithelial Cells. Cancer Res 78:1986-1999
Ferdosi, Shadi; Rehder, Douglas S; Maranian, Paul et al. (2018) Stage Dependence, Cell-Origin Independence, and Prognostic Capacity of Serum Glycan Fucosylation, ?1-4 Branching, ?1-6 Branching, and ?2-6 Sialylation in Cancer. J Proteome Res 17:543-558
Zhou, Xiaorong; Padanad, Mahesh S; Evers, Bret M et al. (2018) Modulation of Mutant KrasG12D -Driven Lung Tumorigenesis In Vivo by Gain or Loss of PCDH7 Function. Mol Cancer Res :
Abrams, Zachary B; Zucker, Mark; Wang, Min et al. (2018) Thirty biologically interpretable clusters of transcription factors distinguish cancer type. BMC Genomics 19:738
Pietanza, M Catherine; Waqar, Saiama N; Krug, Lee M et al. (2018) Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase II Study of Temozolomide in Combination With Either Veliparib or Placebo in Patients With Relapsed-Sensitive or Refractory Small-Cell Lung Cancer. J Clin Oncol 36:2386-2394
Huang, Fang; Ni, Min; Chalishazar, Milind D et al. (2018) Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase Dependence in a Subset of Small Cell Lung Cancers. Cell Metab 28:369-382.e5
Tanaka, Ichidai; Sato, Mitsuo; Kato, Toshio et al. (2018) eIF2?, a subunit of translation-initiation factor EIF2, is a potential therapeutic target for non-small cell lung cancer. Cancer Sci 109:1843-1852
Robichaux, Jacqulyne P; Elamin, Yasir Y; Tan, Zhi et al. (2018) Mechanisms and clinical activity of an EGFR and HER2 exon 20-selective kinase inhibitor in non-small cell lung cancer. Nat Med 24:638-646
Pozo, Karine; Minna, John D; Johnson, Jane E (2018) Identifying a missing lineage driver in a subset of lung neuroendocrine tumors. Genes Dev 32:865-867

Showing the most recent 10 out of 1059 publications