Foundations will be laid in this proposal for use of both functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps and resting-state functional connectivity maps to study brain plasticity that occurs following surgery to repair peripheral nerves injured by trauma. A rat-brain model of nerve injury of the forearm will be developed at 9.4T. There are three well-focused aims.
In Aim 1, two classes of novel radio frequency surface coils specifically tailored to the rat brain will be developed as follows: a one-turn with improved depth sensitivity and a 2X1 multichannel coil for whole rat-brain imaging.
Aim 1 is dedicated to achieving increased fMRI spatial resolution using cubic voxels through use of multichannel arrays of small coils.
Aim 1 serves the other two aims, each of which acquires rat fMRI and functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) data.
In Aim 2, electrical stimulation electrodes will be implanted on the individual peripheral nerves of the rat upper extremity, including the use of multiple electrodes. Extensive preliminary data for the major nerves are reported. Extension to high spatial resolution fMRI of the major nerves and also to smaller branching nerves using the multichannel coils of Aim 1 is proposed. High resolution resting-state functional connectivity maps also will be produced.
This aim i s directed to acquisition of normal high resolution fMRI maps of nerves of the forearm as well as corresponding high resolution resting-state functional connectivity maps. It provides a baseline for interpretation of the trauma and plasticity maps of Aim 3.
In Aim 3, a rat model of nerve trauma is developed. A nerve is cut, and fMRI as well as functional connectivity maps are obtained at acute and sub-acute intervals after the injury. Functional MRI and functional connectivity maps will be acquired at high spatial resolution using the multichannel coils and signal processing methods of Aim 1, and the normative studies of Aim 2 will facilitate interpretation of observed brain plasticity. The overall significance of the project lies in the hypothesis that improved fMRI of the rat in a context of nerve injury will lead to improved models of human disease, and that the manipulations that are possible with a rat model will lead to improved human diagnosis and treatment. Specifically, a long-term goal is to address extremely debilitating injuries of the nerves of the forearm that occur in childbirth and also in adult trauma associated with motorcycle, snowmobile, and automobile accidents, and in military operations such as the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. In addition, the work proposed here is expected to contribute fundamentally to knowledge of brain plasticity following nerve injury. 2.

Public Health Relevance

. The overall significance of the project lies in the hypothesis that improved fMRI of the rat in a context of nerve injury will lead to improved models of human disease, and that the manipulations that are possible with a rat model will lead to improved human diagnosis and treatment. Specifically, a long-term goal is to address extremely debilitating injuries of the nerves of the forearm that occur in childbirth and also in adult trauma associated with motorcycle, snowmobile, and automobile accidents, and in military operations such as the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. In addition, the work proposed here is expected to contribute fundamentally to knowledge of brain plasticity following nerve injury. 1

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
2R01EB000215-21A2
Application #
7662982
Study Section
Medical Imaging Study Section (MEDI)
Program Officer
Liu, Guoying
Project Start
1986-01-01
Project End
2011-04-30
Budget Start
2009-05-15
Budget End
2010-04-30
Support Year
21
Fiscal Year
2009
Total Cost
$643,758
Indirect Cost
Name
Medical College of Wisconsin
Department
Biophysics
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
937639060
City
Milwaukee
State
WI
Country
United States
Zip Code
53226
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Mett, R R; Sidabras, J W; Hyde, J S (2016) Meta-metallic coils and resonators: Methods for high Q-value resonant geometries. Rev Sci Instrum 87:084703
Pawela, Christopher; DeYoe, Edgar; Pashaie, Ramin (2016) Intracranial Injection of an Optogenetics Viral Vector Followed by Optical Cannula Implantation for Neural Stimulation in Rat Brain Cortex. Methods Mol Biol 1408:227-41
Rowe, Daniel B; Bruce, Iain P; Nencka, Andrew S et al. (2016) Separation of parallel encoded complex-valued slices (SPECS) from a single complex-valued aliased coil image. Magn Reson Imaging 34:359-69
Yuan, Rui; Di, Xin; Taylor, Paul A et al. (2016) Functional topography of the thalamocortical system in human. Brain Struct Funct 221:1971-84
Li, Rupeng; Liu, Xiping; Sidabras, Jason W et al. (2015) Restoring susceptibility induced MRI signal loss in rat brain at 9.4 T: A step towards whole brain functional connectivity imaging. PLoS One 10:e0119450
Hudetz, Anthony G; Liu, Xiping; Pillay, Siveshigan (2015) Dynamic repertoire of intrinsic brain states is reduced in propofol-induced unconsciousness. Brain Connect 5:10-22
Hyde, James S; Li, Rupeng (2014) Functional connectivity in rat brain at 200 ?m resolution. Brain Connect 4:470-80
Pillay, Siveshigan; Liu, Xiping; Baracskay, P├ęter et al. (2014) Brainstem stimulation increases functional connectivity of basal forebrain-paralimbic network in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Brain Connect 4:523-34
Li, Rupeng; Machol 4th, Jacques A; Liu, Xiping et al. (2014) C7 nerve root sensory distribution in peripheral nerves: a bold functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation at 9.4 T. Muscle Nerve 49:40-6

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