Cancer prevention and control rely not only on genetics and molecular biology but also social and behavioral variables that are major determinants of cancer incidence and cancer outcomes.
The specific aims of this biobehavioral training application are: ? ? 1. Continue a training program with a /slightly revised /core curriculum in biobehavioral and outcomes research, communications, and practice outcomes; ? ? 2. Recruit qualified applicants to the training program from (1) social science-based disciplines (both pre-doctoral and post-doctoral) such as psychology, health services research, and economics, and (2) PhD-trained basic scientists or doctorate-trained health professionals (nurses and physicians); and ? ? 3. Provide practical experience in interdisciplinary research through participation in new and existing research projects on cancer prevention (tobacco & tobacco related cancers, nutrition, genetics, chemoprevention, cancer communications and physical activity) and on health services research and policy (outcomes of prevention and care including quality of life and cost-effectiveness). ? ? Program faculty have developed and institutionalized a multidisciplinary training program that has met or exceeded all of the goals set forth in the original application using measurable criteria. Formal coursework will continue to be provided within the Schools of Public Health and Pharmacy and recruitment will include these Schools and two new schools, Nursing and Social Work. We have developed new curricula focused on cancer prevention and control and formalized this new curriculum with a Certificate in Cancer Prevention that is now offered University-wide and will engage a larger number of scholars in this area. An Affiliate Program has been integrated to provide training to others funded from different sources. Minority students have constituted 25% of all trainees. The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center continues to provide major field experience, along with Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, Seattle Veterans Administration, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, and Seattle-King County Health Department. We have enrolled 13 new fellows in cancer prevention and control, and 5 affiliate fellows. We have engaged 28 faculty from multiple academic settings in the training and support of these new fellows; these faculty will be a continued presence in the resubmission and in the next five years of training. We have placed 2 post-doctoral fellows in faculty or scientific positions and 3 predoctoral fellows in postdoctoral fellowships or training opportunities. The broad effects of this training grant are felt by the faculty, the trainees, the affiliate fellows, and, indeed, by the departments and schools that house all of us. We seek continuous funding for our next five years. ? ? ? ?

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Education Projects (R25)
Project #
3R25CA092408-06S1
Application #
7280569
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Program Officer
Ogunbiyi, Peter
Project Start
2001-07-11
Project End
2009-06-30
Budget Start
2006-09-01
Budget End
2007-06-30
Support Year
6
Fiscal Year
2006
Total Cost
$42,251
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Washington
Department
Miscellaneous
Type
Schools of Public Health
DUNS #
605799469
City
Seattle
State
WA
Country
United States
Zip Code
98195
Johnson, Caroline M; Molina, Yamile; Blas, Magaly et al. (2018) ""The disease is mine, the body is mine, I decide"": Individual, interpersonal, and institutional barriers and facilitators among survivors of women's cancers in Andean countries. Health Care Women Int 39:522-535
Plascak, Jesse J; Griffith, William C; Workman, Tomomi et al. (2018) Evaluation of the relationship between residential orchard density and dimethyl organophosphate pesticide residues in house dust. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol :
Miles, Fayth L; Neuhouser, Marian L; Zhang, Zuo-Feng (2018) Concentrated sugars and incidence of prostate cancer in a prospective cohort. Br J Nutr 120:703-710
Scheel, John R; Tillack, Allison A; Mercer, Lauren et al. (2018) Mobile Versus Fixed Facility: Latinas' Attitudes and Preferences for Obtaining a Mammogram. J Am Coll Radiol 15:19-28
Scheel, John R; Molina, Yamile; Anderson, Benjamin O et al. (2018) Breast Cancer Beliefs as Potential Targets for Breast Cancer Awareness Efforts to Decrease Late-Stage Presentation in Uganda. J Glob Oncol :1-9
Molina, Yamile; Briant, Katherine J; Sanchez, Janeth I et al. (2018) Knowledge and social engagement change in intention to be screened for colorectal cancer. Ethn Health 23:461-479
Molina, Yamile; McKell, Marnyce S; Mendoza, Norma et al. (2018) Health Volunteerism and Improved Cancer Health for Latina and African American Women and Their Social Networks: Potential Mechanisms. J Cancer Educ 33:59-66
Scheel, John R; Molina, Yamile; Patrick, Donald L et al. (2017) Breast Cancer Downstaging Practices and Breast Health Messaging Preferences Among a Community Sample of Urban and Rural Ugandan Women. J Glob Oncol 3:105-113
Drieling, Rebecca L; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Beresford, Shirley A A et al. (2017) Long-Term Oral Bisphosphonate Therapy and Fractures in Older Women: The Women's Health Initiative. J Am Geriatr Soc 65:1924-1931
Molina, Yamile; Beresford, Shirley A A; Thompson, Beti (2017) Psychological Outcomes After a False Positive Mammogram: Preliminary Evidence for Ethnic Differences Across Time. J Racial Ethn Health Disparities 4:123-133

Showing the most recent 10 out of 123 publications