The program in Developmental Psychology at the University of Michigan is designed to prepare its students to be creative, proficient scholars who will pursue sound, meaningful research, pursue application and be excellent teachers and mentors themselves. The program began in 1965 and has been funded with training grants from NICHD since 1966. The program includes 20 core faculty, 40 affiliated faculty, and is in the Department of Psychology with more than 120 faculty. Courses and research training opportunities are both broad and in depth within the program, within the Department, and within the University community. The broad areas of research within developmental include the following: basic processes, brain and development, schooling and achievement, family, life-span development, developmental psychopathology and cultural/cross national research. Special opportunities exist for training in biopsychology, cross-cultural settings, schools and clinics, and for the application of research to social policy issues such as daycare, gaps in educational achievement, and socio-economic disadvantage. Support is requested for four predoctoral and two postdoctoral trainees per year for a period of five years. These are the number of positions on the current grant. Trainees are chosen from a highly selective pool of applicants, with special attention to recruiting students from underrepresented minorities. The record of achievement of our graduates has been especially strong, with many from minority groups now in prominent professional positions. The program has excellent physical facilities and resources, and we are part of a leading department with facilities and equipment that will match the best in the country. ? ?

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32HD007109-27
Application #
6750033
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1-DSR-H (08))
Program Officer
Mccardle, Peggy D
Project Start
1977-07-01
Project End
2008-04-30
Budget Start
2004-05-01
Budget End
2005-04-30
Support Year
27
Fiscal Year
2004
Total Cost
$257,159
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Michigan Ann Arbor
Department
Psychology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
073133571
City
Ann Arbor
State
MI
Country
United States
Zip Code
48109
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