The goal of the NIMH Repository and Genomics Resource (NRGR) is to further the understanding of the genetic and environmental etiologies of mental disorders. The NRGR receives raw biosamples, such as blood, from NIMH-supported research projects. The NRGR processes these samples to DNA, RNA, cDNA, or cell lines, which can then be used for genomic analyses. The NRGR also receives, curates, and harmonizes clinical/phenotypic data for each subject. Results of genomic analyses on samples in the NRGR are either directly deposited in the NRGR or are linked to a deposit in another public repository. After a proprietary period, the clinical data, genomic data, DNA, RNA, cDNA, and cell lines are made available to all NIMH- approved researchers through a secure web portal. This sharing of uniformly processed biological samples and curated clinical and genomic data from many cohorts leverages the NIMH investment in genetic studies. It provides critical research power by making a very large body of data available for study of the genetic bases for individual mental disorders. Since October 1998, >250K subject samples have been submitted to NRGR and >615K DNA and >15K cell lines have been distributed. There have been >1,700 distributions of clinical and genomic data to >1,000 investigators, resulting in >1,000 publications using NRGR samples and data. Starting in 2011, the NRGR has provided in-depth characterization services for induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and their progenitor somatic cells, as well as limited iPSC production. As its guiding aim, the NRGR will continue to innovate in order to serve the scientific needs of NIMH PIs in a flexible and highly accessible manner, while respecting subject confidentiality, informed consent issues, and PI prerogatives.

Public Health Relevance

The NIMH Repository and Genomics Resource (NRGR) provides research resources that will enable scientists to identify the genetic causes of mental disorders. Understanding these genetic causes will likely result in new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Resource-Related Research Projects--Cooperative Agreements (U24)
Project #
2U24MH068457-18
Application #
9997292
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMH1)
Program Officer
Dutka, Tara
Project Start
2003-07-01
Project End
2025-02-28
Budget Start
2020-03-01
Budget End
2021-02-28
Support Year
18
Fiscal Year
2020
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Rutgers University
Department
Genetics
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
001912864
City
Piscataway
State
NJ
Country
United States
Zip Code
08854
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