This subproject represents an estimate of the percentage of the CTSA funding that is being utilized for a broad area of research (AIDS research, pediatric research, or clinical trials). The Total Cost listed is only an estimate of the amount of CTSA infrastructure going towards this area of research, not direct funding provided by the NCRR grant to the subproject or subproject staff. Boston University proposes to create a Clinical and Translational Science Institute, the BU-BRIDGE Institute, that will integrate, connect and expand our current research and university programs and, thereby, provide an academic and intellectual home for the next generation of clinical and translational investigators. The Institute will be organized around five Divisions: 1} Translational Science Incubator;2) Informatics;3) Clinical Research Enhancements;4) Community Engagements;and 5) Research Education and Training. These five divisions are specifically designed to support the bi-directional development and translation of ideas that begin in the laboratory or bedside move seamlessly back and forth to result in new relevant tools to improve health, health care and delivery. The BU-BRIDGE will accomplish five specific aims: 1) Coordinate existing and identify new collaborations among existing BU scientists with the potential to develop into multidisciplinary translational programs, and facilitate the BU """"""""one stop shopping"""""""" program for creating intellectual property and commercialization of translational scientific ideas;2) Support the further development of existing and the creation of new translational programs and cores through a network of pilot grants. 3) Provide new and existing Clinical and Translational research programs with an expanded and enriched menu of BU-BRIDGE-based institutional support, including an improved, user friendly medical informatics syslem (warehouse), expansion of research from our GCRC into community populations, provide an integrated approach to ethics, regulatory issues, study design, analysis and implementation of health interventions 4) Provide the conduit for bi- directional flow of ideas between clinicians and clinical and basic scientists to more fully engage the community in the research process including setting priorities for investigation, designing studies, ensuring ethical research conduct and implementing best practices based on study results;5) Serve as the Center for training the next generation of investigators with the proper tools to translate basic science into clinical research. The new institute is cross University entity that supercedes traditional departments and schools. It encorporates multiple key university programs including the National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Framingham Heart Study, Boston University Office of Technology Development Commercialization portfolio, Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Bioinformatics, Sargent College of Allied Heath Professionals, the Boston Health Net, Boston Medical Center and VA Hospitals that support the university wide commitment for a home for translational research. The CTSA award will provide the resources to transform the institute by leveraging existing strengths to create an environment that will link new ideas, faculty, trainees and university programs to speed innovations in medical science. The mission of the BU-BRIDGE is relevant to the public health as it will enhance the development of healthcare practices available to members of the local and national communities.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
Type
Linked Specialized Center Cooperative Agreement (UL1)
Project #
5UL1RR025771-03
Application #
8173793
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRR1-SRC (99))
Project Start
2010-05-01
Project End
2011-04-30
Budget Start
2010-05-01
Budget End
2011-04-30
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2010
Total Cost
$278,946
Indirect Cost
Name
Boston University
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
604483045
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02118
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