This proposal is designed to prepare this applicant, through educational and research experiences, for an independent academic career in the field of child maltreatment research. Dr. Lane will work closely with three mentors at the University of Maryland, Baltimore: Dr. Howard Dubowitz from the Department of Pediatrics, and Drs. Patricia Dischinger and Dr. Patricia Langenberg from the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine. Dr. Lane plans to enhance her skills in three specific areas: (1) Identification of where prevention interventions are most needed, through an enhanced understanding of risk and protective factors and expanded skills in epidemiology;(2) Knowledge in design and implementation of prevention interventions, including the ethical issues that may arise;(3) Skills in the evaluation of interventions to prevent maltreatment. The didactic portion of this training will include coursework in the design and evaluation of prevention interventions, advanced epidemiology and biostatistics, cost-effectiveness analysis, and responsible conduct of research. The scholar-initiated research will focus on the epidemiology of overt and occult abusive abdominal trauma, as well as child maltreatment prevention.
The specific aims are to: (1) Estimate the incidence of overt and occult abusive abdominal trauma, (2) Compare clinical outcomes of children with abusive abdominal trauma to those with non-abusive abdominal trauma, (3) Identify factors that are associated with a positive screen for occult abdominal trauma among children with suspected abuse, and (4) Determine the cost-effectiveness of a child maltreatment prevention program. Data from several sources will be used. The KID Inpatient Database, a national sample of pediatric hospitalizations, will be used to examine the incidence of overt abusive abdominal trauma. A screening program for occult abdominal trauma will be developed to estimate its incidence among children with suspected abuse. A cost effectiveness analysis will be conducted for Dr. Dubowitz's SEEK III study, which aims to reduce child abuse incidence via risk factor screening in pediatric primary care. In addition to publications, data from this mentored research award will be used to develop independent proposals in child abuse epidemiology and prevention. This proposal has both short- and long-term public health relevance. The specific research projects will help establish evidence-based practice in the medical management and prevention of child abuse. The training component will provide Dr. Lane with the skills to continue this work in future research projects.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (K23)
Project #
5K23HD055515-05
Application #
8225186
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1-DSR-M (HB))
Program Officer
Maholmes, Valerie
Project Start
2008-03-12
Project End
2014-02-28
Budget Start
2012-03-01
Budget End
2014-02-28
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$128,250
Indirect Cost
$9,500
Name
University of Maryland Baltimore
Department
Public Health & Prev Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
188435911
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21201
Lane, Wendy Gwirtzman (2014) Prevention of child maltreatment. Pediatr Clin North Am 61:873-88
Lane, Wendy Gwirtzman; Dubowitz, Howard; Langenberg, Patricia et al. (2012) Epidemiology of abusive abdominal trauma hospitalizations in United States children. Child Abuse Negl 36:142-8
Lane, Wendy Gwirtzman; Lotwin, Irwin; Dubowitz, Howard et al. (2011) Outcomes for children hospitalized with abusive versus noninflicted abdominal trauma. Pediatrics 127:e1400-5
Dubowitz, Howard; Lane, Wendy G; Semiatin, Joshua N et al. (2011) The safe environment for every kid model: impact on pediatric primary care professionals. Pediatrics 127:e962-70
Smith, Frances I; Qu, Qiang; Hong, Seok Jong et al. (2005) Gene expression profiling of mouse postnatal cerebellar development using oligonucleotide microarrays designed to detect differences in glycoconjugate expression. Gene Expr Patterns 5:740-9