Is it true that males are healthier than females but die younger? If so, why? We plan demographic analyses to address these two overarching questions concerning the health-survival paradox. First, to what extent is the paradox true? How general is it? * According to which definitions and measures and along which dimensions are men healthier than women? * How do male-female morbidity and mortality differences vary with age? * How do they vary over place? * How have they varied over time? * How do they vary across species of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish? Second, to the extent that the paradox is true, why is this the case? Various social and biological hypotheses will be tested by analyzing: Human and nonhuman lifetables (Project 1); Survey and register data on humans in Denmark (Project 2); Survey data on humans in the United States (Project 3) and in Japan, the Philippines and Singapore (Project 4); Longitudinal observations on baboons in the wild in Kenya (Project 5); Longitudinal data on lemurs in the wild on Madagascar and in captivity at Duke and in France (Project 6);and Laboratory data on fruit flies (Project 7). The combination of informative animal models and high-quality human data and sophisticated demographic analyses will provide a deeper understanding of the basis for sex differences in health and survival and of opportunities to reduce these differences.

Public Health Relevance

Is it true that males are healthier than females but die younger? If so, why? This program project supports research projects that address these questions concerning the human health-survival paradox. Findings will provide a deeper understanding of the basis for sex differences in health and survival-and of the opportunities that society and particularly health professionals have to improve health and survival for males and females.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01AG031719-03
Application #
8136158
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1-ZIJ-7 (J2))
Program Officer
Haaga, John G
Project Start
2009-09-30
Project End
2014-08-31
Budget Start
2011-09-01
Budget End
2012-08-31
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$698,014
Indirect Cost
Name
Duke University
Department
Miscellaneous
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
044387793
City
Durham
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27705
Ahrenfeldt, Linda Juel; Larsen, Lisbeth Aagaard; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune et al. (2017) Early-life mortality risks in opposite-sex and same-sex twins: a Danish cohort study of the twin testosterone transfer hypothesis. Ann Epidemiol 27:115-120.e2
Miller, Elizabeth A; Livermore, Joshua A; Alberts, Susan C et al. (2017) Ovarian cycling and reproductive state shape the vaginal microbiota in wild baboons. Microbiome 5:8
Jones, Owen R; Vaupel, James W (2017) Senescence is not inevitable. Biogerontology 18:965-971
Zeng, Yi; Feng, Qiushi; Hesketh, Therese et al. (2017) Survival, disabilities in activities of daily living, and physical and cognitive functioning among the oldest-old in China: a cohort study. Lancet 389:1619-1629
Brasher, Melanie Sereny; George, Linda K; Shi, Xiaoming et al. (2017) Incorporating biomarkers into the study of socio-economic status and health among older adults in China. SSM Popul Health 3:577-585
Oksuzyan, Anna; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Christensen, Kaare et al. (2017) A Cross-National Study of the Gender Gap in Health Among Older Adults in India and China: Similarities and Disparities. Gerontologist :
Colchero, Fernando; Rau, Roland; Jones, Owen R et al. (2016) The emergence of longevous populations. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 113:E7681-E7690
Tung, Jenny; Archie, Elizabeth A; Altmann, Jeanne et al. (2016) Cumulative early life adversity predicts longevity in wild baboons. Nat Commun 7:11181
Wall, Jeffrey D; Schlebusch, Stephen A; Alberts, Susan C et al. (2016) Genomewide ancestry and divergence patterns from low-coverage sequencing data reveal a complex history of admixture in wild baboons. Mol Ecol 25:3469-83
Ahrenfeldt, Linda J; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Möller, Sören et al. (2016) Differences in Religiousness in Opposite-Sex and Same-Sex Twins in a Secular Society. Twin Res Hum Genet 19:35-46

Showing the most recent 10 out of 47 publications