This project within the P01 will advance scientific understanding ofthe potential environmental etiologies of birth defects and preterm birth, which will undoubtedly have important implications for risk assessment and prevention of these common, costly, and often deadly outcomes of pregnancy. In this project we propose the following research-based aims: 1) To determine whether exposures to specific air pollutants (identified in our P20 research) are further modified by gene variants in biotransformation enzymes (e.g., NATs, GSTs, CYPH, or NOS3) for risk of selected birth defects. 2) To determine whether ambient exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), during critical periods of organogenesis, are associated with women delivering infants/fetuses with birth defects, and whether relationships are further modified by gene variants in Aim 1. 3) To determine whether ambient exposures to PAHs, during critical periods of gestation, are associated with women delivering preterm, and 4) To determine whether the built environment is associated with preterm birth either directly or indirectly through a joint effect with ambient air pollution. Our proposed project is highly significant and innovative, it will be accomplished by a highly experienced group of investigators in a rigorous way, will capitalize on the intellectual capacity and resources of our existing Center (P20) as well as a new transdisciplinary research Center at Stanford devoted exclusively to studying prematurity, and will substantially move forward our scientific understanding of a specific source of environmental toxicants - air pollutants, and sentinel indicators of pediatric health - birth defects and preterm birth. No study on birth defects or spontaneous preterm birth and air pollution exposures has been done on the population scale we are proposing. This project will substantially move forward our scientific understanding of a specific source of environmental toxicants - air pollutants, and sentinel indicators of pediatric health - birth defects and preterm birth. This study's results will have obvious practical significance for women of reproductive age in the US because the study addresses individuals'risk at a very basic and potentially avoidable level, i.e., potential exposures where we live.

Public Health Relevance

Birth defects and spontaneous preterm birth represent significant public.health problems in the US and throughout the world. Epidemiologic studies involving birth defects and preterm birth for exposures to environmental contaminants such as PAHs have been severely challenged by limited data availability. In the large California target study region and population proposed in this P01 application, v ie have amassed the unique data features that will remedv such a problem.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01ES022849-02
Application #
8702174
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1-LKB-K)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-06-01
Budget End
2015-05-31
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$84,209
Indirect Cost
Name
University of California Berkeley
Department
Type
DUNS #
124726725
City
Berkeley
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
94704
Padula, Amy M; Balmes, John R; Eisen, Ellen A et al. (2015) Ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pulmonary function in children. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol 25:295-302
Hew, K M; Walker, A I; Kohli, A et al. (2015) Childhood exposure to ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is linked to epigenetic modifications and impaired systemic immunity in T cells. Clin Exp Allergy 45:238-48
Padula, Amy M; Mortimer, Kathleen M; Tager, Ira B et al. (2014) Traffic-related air pollution and risk of preterm birth in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Ann Epidemiol 24:888-95e4
Padula, Amy M; Noth, Elizabeth M; Hammond, S Katharine et al. (2014) Exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during pregnancy and risk of preterm birth. Environ Res 135:221-6