Healthy lifestyle behaviors are essential to the management of diseases, particularly, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hypertension (HTN) [1-4]. Epidemiological studies reveal that a healthy diet, physical activity, and other disease management skills are key factors in preventing and managing the disease [1-3, 5]. Unfortunately, African Americans (AA) do not regularly engage in these healthy behaviors and suffer the consequences of higher diabetes and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity compared to other ethnic groups [1]. African Americans residing in rural areas ofthe Southeast are especially affected because of their socio-cultural context, economic constraints, and limited health care access. As a result there is a need for community-based culturally sensitive interventions aimed at helping AA communities to engage in sustained regular implementation of the recommended health behaviors. While short-term interventions have successfully introduced healthy changes in lifestyle behaviors among African Americans (AAs), benefits associated with maintaining healthy lifestyles have yet to be demonstrated [6, 7]. For rural AAs, at least two factors currently hinder long-term success. First, community programs run for limited periods of time on limited funding. Second, most interventions have been conducted with urban populations and have failed to incorporate a critical influence for rural AAs ? the family. Treating men and women with T2D is most effective when there is a change in diet for the entire household [8, 9], but to our knowledge studies have not focused on AA family involvement in T2D dietary interventions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Type
Exploratory Grants (P20)
Project #
2P20MD000175-11
Application #
8353828
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMD1-RN (01))
Project Start
2012-06-01
Project End
2017-05-31
Budget Start
2012-06-13
Budget End
2013-05-31
Support Year
11
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$199,719
Indirect Cost
$54,858
Name
North Carolina Central University
Department
Type
DUNS #
783691801
City
Durham
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27707
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Grant, Delores J; Hoyo, Cathrine; Oliver, Shannon D et al. (2013) Association of uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase 2B gene variants with serum glucuronide levels and prostate cancer risk. Genet Test Mol Biomarkers 17:3-9
Vivar, Juan C; Pemu, Priscilla; McPherson, Ruth et al. (2013) Redundancy control in pathway databases (ReCiPa): an application for improving gene-set enrichment analysis in Omics studies and "Big data" biology. OMICS 17:414-22

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