Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): Gantz, Bruce J. PROJECT SUMMARY ? PROJECT 1 The past 35 years of cochlear implant (CI) research have focused on outcomes primarily related to speech perception. Candidacy recently has extended into the less severely impaired population due to newer, shorter implants, including hybrid (acoustic-plus-electric) designs. The potential for improvement/change in domains other than speech perception can inform both policy and rehabilitative decision-making. Human ecology describes the relationship between humans and their natural, social, and built environments. This concept considers that human behaviors must be studied from both the social and natural science vantage points. In hearing health care, success with intervention is as much related to the anatomy/physiology of the individual as it is to the environmental and personal (i.e., ecological) factors that make each individual unique from the next. The overall goal of this project is to determine the impact of intervention on user's hearing-related functions and disability in their natural environments (i.e., real-world outcomes) and to clarify what ecological factors, as well as perceptual factors, affect these real-world outcomes. To date most cochlear implant (CI) research has focused on determining the effect of anatomical and physiological factors on laboratory outcomes, such as speech perception. We recognize, however, that the real-world outcomes exhibit great heterogeneity, which is likely due, in part, to the broader range of environmental and personal contextual (i.e., ecological) underpinnings in the hearing impaired population. As has been the case with hearing aids (HA), much variance can be accounted for by examining individual ecological factors. Very little is understood about (1) the characteristics of ecological factors of the CI population, (2) the influence that ecological factors have on the heterogeneity of real-world outcomes of this population, and (3) how this influences changes over time. With the expanded indications for CI quantifying the ecological factors that parlay into real-world outcomes in CI is critical because real-world outcomes ultimately determine societal burden and policy. Furthermore, because traditional retrospective self-reported outcome measures are often subject to recall bias, we will, in addition to standardized questionnaires and a data-logging feature on the processors, use a smartphone-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) system to capture users' real-time experiences in situ (i.e., in natural environment). This will allow for measurement of the characteristics of listening environments in addition to subjective assessment of listening difficulty/ease.
Two Aims have been designed to study the influence of ecological factors have on outcomes of listeners with a CI.
Aim 1. To characterize environmental factors that are relevant to listening and communication for participants in each intervention group (Aim 1A) and to determine the effect of intervention on these factors (Aim 1B).
Aim 2. To document the effect of intervention on real-world outcomes (Aim 2A) and determine to what extent environmental, personal, and perceptual factors moderate those outcomes (Aim 2B) over time (Aim 2C).

Public Health Relevance

Gantz, Bruce J. PROJECT NARRATIVE ? PROJECT 1 To date most cochlear implant (CI) research has focused on determining the effect of anatomical and physiological factors on laboratory outcomes, such as speech and music perception. We recognize, however, that the real-world outcomes exhibit great heterogeneity, which is likely due, in part, to the broader range of environmental and personal contextual (i.e., ecological) underpinnings in the hearing impaired population. The overall goal of this project is to determine the impact of CI intervention on user's outcomes in their natural environments and to clarify what individual factors can affect these real-world outcomes.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
2P50DC000242-31A1
Application #
9415700
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDC1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2017-12-01
Budget End
2018-11-30
Support Year
31
Fiscal Year
2018
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Iowa
Department
Type
DUNS #
062761671
City
Iowa City
State
IA
Country
United States
Zip Code
52246
McMurray, Bob; Farris-Trimble, Ashley; Rigler, Hannah (2017) Waiting for lexical access: Cochlear implants or severely degraded input lead listeners to process speech less incrementally. Cognition 169:147-164
Tejani, Viral D; Abbas, Paul J; Brown, Carolyn J (2017) Relationship Between Peripheral and Psychophysical Measures of Amplitude Modulation Detection in Cochlear Implant Users. Ear Hear 38:e268-e284
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Abbas, Paul J; Tejani, Viral D; Scheperle, Rachel A et al. (2017) Using Neural Response Telemetry to Monitor Physiological Responses to Acoustic Stimulation in Hybrid Cochlear Implant Users. Ear Hear 38:409-425
Shearer, A Eliot; Eppsteiner, Robert W; Frees, Kathy et al. (2017) Genetic variants in the peripheral auditory system significantly affect adult cochlear implant performance. Hear Res 348:138-142
Sjoberg, Kristin M; Driscoll, Virginia D; Gfeller, Kate et al. (2017) The impact of electric hearing on children's timbre and pitch perception and talker discrimination. Cochlear Implants Int 18:36-48
Samuelson, Larissa K; McMurray, Bob (2017) What does it take to learn a word? Wiley Interdiscip Rev Cogn Sci 8:
Oleson, Jacob J; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; McMurray, Bob et al. (2017) Detecting time-specific differences between temporal nonlinear curves: Analyzing data from the visual world paradigm. Stat Methods Med Res 26:2708-2725
Scheperle, Rachel A; Tejani, Viral D; Omtvedt, Julia K et al. (2017) Delayed changes in auditory status in cochlear implant users with preserved acoustic hearing. Hear Res 350:45-57
Brown, Carolyn J; Jeon, Eun-Kyung; Driscoll, Virginia et al. (2017) Effects of Long-Term Musical Training on Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials. Ear Hear 38:e74-e84

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