The goal of this renewal application is to enhance smoking cessation rates for homeless smokers by testing the effects of 1) intensive smoking intervention, and 2) integrating alcohol abuse treatment with smoking cessation. Despite progress in reducing cigarette smoking in the general US population, smoking rates and related heart disease and cancer morbidity remain strikingly high among the poor and underserved. One group generally unreached by smoking cessation interventions are those experiencing homelessness among whom cigarette smoking rate remains an alarming 70% or greater. The majority of homeless smokers also abuse alcohol and other drugs, which makes quitting more difficult and magnifies the health consequences of tobacco use. We recently completed the first NIH-funded (R01HL081522;Okuyemi, PI) smoking cessation clinical trial (n=430) targeting homeless smokers with 8-week treatment with nicotine patch and 6 sessions of motivational interviewing. This relatively low intensity study showed cotinine-verified 7-day quit rates of 9.3% for MI vs. 5.6% for Brief Advice at 26 weeks. We also found that quitting smoking was associated with reduced alcohol use. These smoking quit rates are low compared to the general population, demonstrating the challenge for tobacco interventions in this population and the need for more research. The goal of this renewal application is to evaluate interventions designed to enhance smoking cessation rates for homeless smokers by testing the effects of 1) intensive smoking intervention (i.e. higher dose and duration than our previous R01), and 2) integrating alcohol abuse treatment with smoking cessation. We will utilize a 3-group randomized design to test study hypotheses. The three study conditions are 1) Integrated Intensive Smoking intervention using cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) plus Alcohol intervention -(IS+A);2) Intensive Smoking Intervention using CBT- (IS);or 3) Usual Care (brief smoking cessation and brief alcohol counseling both based on the US Public Health Service's Guidelines)-(UC). In addition, all participants will receive 12-week treatment with combination nicotine patch plus gum or lozenge. Participants will be recruited from homeless shelters and facilities in the Minneapolis/St Paul area. Primary smoking outcome is cotinine-verified 7-day smoking abstinence at week 52 follow-up while Primary alcohol outcome will be breathalyzer-verified 90-day continuous alcohol abstinence at week 52. Recruitment and retention will be enhanced by use of debit cards, bus passes, other non-monetary incentives, attractive intervention materials, collaboration with homeless shelters, and advice from a Community Advisory Board. Findings from proposed research have a high potential to inform treatment of nicotine dependence and alcohol abuse in an underserved population that has been recalcitrant to treatments. Data from this study could influence policy and programs aimed at reducing tobacco- and alcohol- related disease burden in vulnerable populations.

Public Health Relevance

Despite progress in reducing cigarette smoking in the general US population, smoking rates and related morbidity remain strikingly high among the poor and underserved. One group generally unreached by smoking cessation interventions are those experiencing homelessness among whom cigarette smoking rate remains an alarming 70 percent or greater. The majority of homeless smokers also abuse alcohol and other drugs, which makes quitting more difficult and magnifies the health consequences of tobacco use. The goal of this renewal application is to enhance smoking cessation rates for homeless smokers by testing the effects of 1) intensive smoking intervention, and 2) integrating alcohol abuse treatment with smoking cessation. We will utilize a 3- group randomized design to test study hypotheses. Findings from proposed research have a high potential to inform treatment of nicotine dependence and alcohol abuse in an underserved population that has been recalcitrant to treatments effective in the general population. Data from this study could influence policy and programs aimed at reducing tobacco- and alcohol-related disease burden in vulnerable populations.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
2R01HL081522-05A1
Application #
8630855
Study Section
Health Disparities and Equity Promotion Study Section (HDEP)
Program Officer
Bonds, Denise
Project Start
2005-07-01
Project End
2019-01-31
Budget Start
2014-02-15
Budget End
2015-01-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$1,302,220
Indirect Cost
$445,496
Name
University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Department
Family Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
555917996
City
Minneapolis
State
MN
Country
United States
Zip Code
55455
Ojo-Fati, Olamide; Joseph, Anne M; Ig-Izevbekhai, Jed et al. (2017) Practical issues regarding implementing a randomized clinical trial in a homeless population: strategies and lessons learned. Trials 18:305
Pinsker, Erika Ashley; Hennrikus, Deborah Jane; Erickson, Darin J et al. (2017) Trends in self-efficacy to quit and smoking urges among homeless smokers participating in a smoking cessation RCT. Addict Behav 78:43-50
Pinsker, Erika Ashley; Hennrikus, Deborah Jane; Erickson, Darin J et al. (2017) Cessation-related weight concern among homeless male and female smokers. Prev Med Rep 7:77-85
Rogers, Charles R; Robinson, Cendrine D; Arroyo, Cassandra et al. (2017) Colorectal Cancer Screening Uptake's Association With Psychosocial and Sociodemographic Factors Among Homeless Blacks and Whites. Health Educ Behav 44:928-936
Robinson, Cendrine D; Rogers, Charles R; Okuyemi, Kolawole S (2016) Depression Symptoms Among Homeless Smokers: Effect of Motivational Interviewing. Subst Use Misuse 51:1393-7
Ojo-Fati, O; Thomas, J L; Vogel, R I et al. (2016) Predictors of Adherence to Nicotine Replacement Therapy (Nicotine Patch) Among Homeless Persons Enrolled in a Randomized Controlled Trial Targeting Smoking Cessation. J Fam Med 3:
Richards, Christina M; Sharif, Faduma; Eischen, Sara et al. (2015) Retention of Homeless Smokers in the Power to Quit Study. Nicotine Tob Res 17:1104-11
Ojo-Fati, Olamide; John, Florence; Thomas, Janet et al. (2015) Integrating smoking cessation and alcohol use treatment in homeless populations: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Trials 16:385
Hammett, Patrick; Fu, Steven S; Lando, Harry A et al. (2015) The association of military discharge variables with smoking status among homeless Veterans. Prev Med 81:275-80
Reitzel, Lorraine R; Nguyen, Nga; Eischen, Sara et al. (2014) Is smoking cessation associated with worse comorbid substance use outcomes among homeless adults? Addiction 109:2098-104

Showing the most recent 10 out of 17 publications