This proposal seeks 5 years of continued support for a longitudinal study of processes that contribute to the high levels of psychopathology experienced by Mexican American youth. Consistent with priorities in the NIMH Strategic Plan (2008), this study is designed to (1) chart mental illness trajectories of Mexican American youth, (2) increase our capacity to predict who in this population is at risk for mental illness by identifying individual, environmental, and social factors that contribute to both risk and resilience processes, (3) identify contributors to the mental health disparities experienced by Mexican Americans, and (4) provide a scientific foundation for the design of the next generation of preventive interventions for this population. Beginning with a diverse sample of 750 Mexican American families, this study tests hypotheses regarding how interactions of individuals'cultural orientations with characteristics of family, community, peer, and school contexts contribute to the mental health burden of this population. A unique aspect of this study is the assessment of cultural orientation (i.e., degree of endorsement of traditional Mexican cultural values and degree of endorsement of U.S. cultural values) of children and parents as well as the degree to which communities and schools support these cultural traditions. Children and their parents were assessed initially when children were in 5th and 7th grades. Results supported the specific aims: (1) changes in children's and parents'cultural orientations are related to greater risk for mental health disorders;(2) family characteristics, such as parent-child conflict, mediate the relation between cultural orientation mismatches and children's psychopathology;and (3) child and parent cultural orientations buffer relations between common risk factors (e.g., economic hardship) and children's mental health. The proposed continuation will assess this sample of children and their parents as youth experience the rapid developmental changes of middle adolescence (grades 10 and 12) when rates of psychopathology accelerate.
The specific aims remain: (1) cultural mismatches between children and family, community, and school contexts will be related to risk for psychopathology;(2) family and peer group processes will mediate relations between cultural mismatches and psychopathology;and (3) cultural orientations of children and their parents will moderate relations between risk factors and psychopathology. Longitudinal tests of these aims will provide a strong foundation for the next generation of prevention programs to reduce mental health disparities for Mexican Americans.

Public Health Relevance

This longitudinal study of 750 Mexican American adolescents and their parents is important from a public health standpoint because of the mental health disparities Mexican American adolescents experience, and the limited knowledge about factors that contribute to these disparities. This study is designed to (1) chart mental illness trajectories of Mexican American youth, (2) increase our capacity to predict who in this population is at risk for mental illness by identifying individual, environmental, and social factors that contribute to both risk and resilience processes, (3) identify contributors to the mental health disparities experienced by Mexican Americans, and (4) provide a firm scientific foundation for the design of the next generation of preventive interventions for this population in order to reduce the individual, family, and societal burden of psychopathology within this population.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01MH068920-10
Application #
8432471
Study Section
Psychosocial Development, Risk and Prevention Study Section (PDRP)
Program Officer
Zehr, Julia L
Project Start
2003-07-01
Project End
2014-02-28
Budget Start
2013-03-01
Budget End
2014-02-28
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$565,862
Indirect Cost
$184,435
Name
Arizona State University-Tempe Campus
Department
Social Sciences
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
943360412
City
Tempe
State
AZ
Country
United States
Zip Code
85287
White, Rebecca M B; Zeiders, Katharine H; Knight, George P et al. (2014) Mexican origin youths' trajectories of perceived peer discrimination from middle childhood to adolescence: variation by neighborhood ethnic concentration. J Youth Adolesc 43:1700-14
UmaƱa-Taylor, Adriana J; O'Donnell, Megan; Knight, George P et al. (2014) Mexican-origin Early Adolescents' Ethnic Socialization, Ethnic Identity, and Psychosocial Functioning. Couns Psychol 42:170-200
Basilio, Camille D; Knight, George P; O'Donnell, Megan et al. (2014) The Mexican American biculturalism scale: bicultural comfort, facility, and advantages for adolescents and adults. Psychol Assess 26:539-54
Moosmann, Danyel A V; Roosa, Mark W; Knight, George P (2014) Generational Patterns in Mexican Americans' Academic Performance in an Unwelcoming Political Context. J Appl Dev Psychol 35:102-110
White, Rebecca M B; Zeiders, Katharine H; Gonzales, Nancy A et al. (2013) Cultural values, U.S. neighborhood danger, and Mexican American parents' parenting. J Fam Psychol 27:365-75
Brittian, Aerika S; O'Donnell, Megan; Knight, George P et al. (2013) Associations between adolescents' perceived discrimination and prosocial tendencies: the mediating role of Mexican American values. J Youth Adolesc 42:328-41
Vargas, Danyel A; Roosa, Mark W; Knight, George P et al. (2013) Family and cultural processes linking family instability to Mexican American adolescent adjustment. J Fam Psychol 27:387-97
Zeiders, Katharine H; Roosa, Mark W; Knight, George P et al. (2013) Mexican American adolescents' profiles of risk and mental health: a person-centered longitudinal approach. J Adolesc 36:603-12
White, Rebecca M B; Deardorff, Julianna; Liu, Yu et al. (2013) Contextual amplification or attenuation of the impact of pubertal timing on Mexican-origin boys' mental health symptoms. J Adolesc Health 53:692-8
Geiser, Christian; Keller, Brian; Lockhart, Ginger (2013) First Versus Second Order Latent Growth Curve Models: Some Insights From Latent State-Trait Theory. Struct Equ Modeling 20:

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