Engineered Intravascular Catheters for the Treatment of Bacteremia Most patients undergo intravascular catheter placement at some time during their hospitalization, Ensuing infection is the most common complication associated with intravascular devices and subsequent bacteremia can be a highly morbid and oftentimes lethal consequence. In this project, we will apply the principle of phase-boundary catalysis in catheter design and test ability of engineered intravascular catheters in preventing infections and treatment of bacteremia on animal models.

Public Health Relevance

Engineered Intravascular Catheters for the Treatment of Bacteremia The traditional approach for treating an intravascular catheter infection has been catheter removal, administration of parenteral antibiotic(s), and replacement of the catheter at a separate site. Patients suffer severe discomfort. The goal of this research is to study the ability of engineered intravascular catheters in preventing infections and treatment of bacteremia.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Exploratory/Developmental Grants (R21)
Project #
1R21AI110924-01
Application #
8676368
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel ()
Program Officer
Perdue, Samuel S
Project Start
2014-04-10
Project End
2016-03-31
Budget Start
2014-04-10
Budget End
2015-03-31
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$187,500
Indirect Cost
$62,500
Name
Stevens Institute of Technology
Department
Chemistry
Type
Schools of Engineering
DUNS #
064271570
City
Hoboken
State
NJ
Country
United States
Zip Code
07030
Traba, Christian; Liang, Jun F (2015) Bacteria responsive antibacterial surfaces for indwelling device infections. J Control Release 198:18-25