We propose to improve the quality of the Immunology Training Program at Dartmouth Medical School (DMS) that has been supported by the T32 grant, "Immunobiology of myeloid and lymphoid cells", for the past twenty years. The primary goals of this program continue to be to recruit highly motivated and talented postdoctoral fellows and graduate students and to provide them with first-rate training in immunology to prepare them for scientific research careers, including careers in academia as independent investigators. Scientific training occurs in both animal and human systems;the latter enhances our ability to attract and train MD/PhD predoctoral and MD postdoctoral trainees. The program faculty's research interests span a wide range of immunologic areas that allows entering trainees a considerable breadth of conceptual and experimental choices of research topics. Research topics include, but are not limited to, antigen presentation and induction of immunity, immunity against viruses, tumor immunity and immunotherapy, inflammation, vaccines, mucosal immunity, regulation of immunity, and autoimmunity. A critical strength of the proposal is the high quality of the research programs of the nineteen well-funded faculty trainers, drawn from six DMS departments (Biochemistry, Genetics, Medicine, Microbiology &Immunology, Pathology, and Physiology and Neurobiology). DMS has outstanding research facilities, especially with the expansion of the Rubin building in 2003 that houses the NCI-sponsored Norris Cotton Cancer Center. The laboratories are fully equipped to support a full-range of state-of-the-art research in immunology, biochemistry, and molecular biology techniques. Dartmouth has AAALAC approved animal facilities. DMS has substantial support for the Immunology Program based on the quality of the program faculty, a NIH COBRE grant in immunology, and the Immunotherapy Center. Training in immunology spans several graduate programs: Molecular and Cell Biology, the Program in Experimental and Molecular Medicine, and the MD/PhD program. Consistent with the needs of future scientists, Immunology training at Dartmouth involves a multi/interdisciplinary approach nurtured by a highly interactive environment. Students and postdoctoral fellows benefit from a vigorous faculty involvement and scientific exchanges characteristic of the Dartmouth tradition of close student-faculty interactions. In addition to classic scientific training, we have created professional development courses and workshops to help students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty succeed in their careers. The Immunology Program has an outstanding track-record of success and we propose to build on this success to educate and promote the next generation of research scientists in immunology.

Public Health Relevance

This proposal is designed to improve the quality of the Immunology Training Program at Dartmouth Medical School. The primary goals of this program continue to be to recruit highly motivated and talented postdoctoral fellows and graduate students and to provide them with first-rate training in immunology to prepare them for scientific research careers, including careers in academia as independent investigators. Scientific training occurs for predoctoral students and postdoctoral fellows pursuing PhD or MD/PhD career paths. The program faculty's research interests span a wide range of immunologic areas that allow entering trainees a considerable breadth of conceptual and experimental choices of research topics.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32AI007363-23
Application #
8665859
Study Section
Transplantation Biology &Immunology-2 (AITC)
Program Officer
Prograis, Lawrence J
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
23
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Dartmouth College
Department
Microbiology/Immun/Virology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
City
Hanover
State
NH
Country
United States
Zip Code
03755
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