The challenge of drug-resistant microbes requires that a new generation of basic scientists be broadly trained and educated in anti-infective research so that a cadre of investigators will be available in the future to combat this global health problem. Coupled with the problem of resistance, this need is especially acute given the reduced number of new, effective antibiotics that have entered clinical practice in the past two decades. Thus, the objective of this new training grant at Emory University is to provide high quality training to a select group of highly motivated graduate students for careers as independent investigators in research on anti- infectives. The program will select three PhD candidates yearly from four graduate programs within the Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences of Emory University for a two year period of training in the areas of antimicrobial resistance and therapeutic discovery. These graduate programs include faculty members from basic science and clinical departments of the School of Medicine, Emory College of Arts and Sciences and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Educational training will consist of a course of study and programmatic events in sub-disciplines that emphasize research and education in anti-infective resistance and drug development;research training opportunities are provided in 25 laboratories with active research programs in these areas of research.

Public Health Relevance

This new T32 grant will provide training in research on anti-infectives for graduate students. The training faculty work on a wide range of projects dealing with anti-infective resistance, drug discovery and development with respect to major microbial pathogens and their associated diseases that impact public health, including tuberculosis, malaria, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, sexually transmitted infections, pneumonia, meningitis and skin/soft tissue infections. The over-arching goal of this training program is to prepare graduate students for careers as investigators to continue research on medically important pathogens and anti-infective discovery.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
1T32AI106699-01A1
Application #
8737434
Study Section
Microbiology and Infectious Diseases B Subcommittee (MID)
Program Officer
Robbins, Christiane M
Project Start
2014-06-01
Project End
2019-05-31
Budget Start
2014-06-01
Budget End
2015-05-31
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$91,780
Indirect Cost
$4,428
Name
Emory University
Department
Microbiology/Immun/Virology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
066469933
City
Atlanta
State
GA
Country
United States
Zip Code
30322
Nawrocki, Kathryn L; Crispell, Emily K; McBride, Shonna M (2014) Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance Mechanisms of Gram-Positive Bacteria. Antibiotics (Basel) 3:461-492
Edwards, Adrianne N; Nawrocki, Kathryn L; McBride, Shonna M (2014) Conserved oligopeptide permeases modulate sporulation initiation in Clostridium difficile. Infect Immun 82:4276-91