This multidisciplinary five-year program is designed to train predoctoral (PhD) and postdoctoral students in three distinct but interrelated areas: Environmental Biostatistics, Environmental Epidemiology, and Environmental Health Science. The goal is to prepare scientists to address emerging challenges in environmental health science research. By constructing a training program that involves collaboration among these three critical scientific areas, we have a unique opportunity to advance the field of environmental health in ways that could not be achieved if the training were achieved via three single disciplinary programs. Current environmental health research, whether involving experiments with laboratory animals or observational studies of human populations, is becoming increasingly complex. The valid quantification of exposures to environmental hazards requires consideration of complicated time- dependent multiple exposure profiles. Assessment of early biologic effects (biomarkers) requires elucidation of how exposure profiles relate to multiple, intermediate, and often correlated endpoints. A critical component is a better understanding of heterogeneity across individuals in environmental effects through the creative use of state-of-the-art systems biology technologies for global measures of gene expression, levels of metabolites, epigenetic alterations and single nucleotide polymorphisms across the genome. Assessment of exposure-disease relationships thus requires knowledge of the connections between exposure, early biological effects, genetic factors and their potential interaction with the environment, uniting al this knowledge to understand how these factors may affect multiple, possibly correlated health outcomes. Training programs that produce well-rounded scientists who can address these complex research questions are clearly needed to advance environmental health science. Funding is requested for the support of 23 predoctoral trainees (9 BIOS, 7 EPID, and 7 ENVR) and for 5 postdoctoral trainees (1 BIOS, 2 EPID, and 2 ENVR). The Departments of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Environmental Sciences and Engineering, the three largest and most recognized departments in the 2nd-ranked UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, have available all the personnel and facilities sufficient to provide comprehensive predoctoral and postdoctoral training.

Public Health Relevance

This multidisciplinary five-year program is designed to train predoctoral (PhD) and postdoctoral students in three distinct but interrelated areas: Environmental Biostatistics, Environmental Epidemiology, and Environmental Health Science. The goal is to prepare scientists to address emerging challenges in public health and medical research in environmental health.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32ES007018-37
Application #
8501450
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1-LWJ-D (T))
Program Officer
Humble, Michael C
Project Start
1977-07-01
Project End
2017-06-30
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
37
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$1,181,407
Indirect Cost
$69,697
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Biostatistics & Other Math Sci
Type
Schools of Public Health
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
Mwanza, Jean-Claude; Budenz, Donald L; Warren, Joshua L et al. (2015) Retinal nerve fibre layer thickness floor and corresponding functional loss in glaucoma. Br J Ophthalmol 99:732-7
Edwards, Sharon E; Maxson, Pamela; Miranda, Marie Lynn et al. (2015) Cadmium levels in a North Carolina cohort: Identifying risk factors for elevated levels during pregnancy. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol 25:427-32
Mwanza, Jean-Claude; Warren, Joshua L; Hochberg, Jessica T et al. (2015) Combining Frequency Doubling Technology Perimetry and Scanning Laser Polarimetry for Glaucoma Detection. J Glaucoma 24:561-7
Mansfield, Theodore J; Rodriguez, Daniel A; Huegy, Joseph et al. (2015) The Effects of Urban Form on Ambient Air Pollution and Public Health Risk: A Case Study in Raleigh, North Carolina. Risk Anal 35:901-18
Lamichhane, Archana P; Warren, Joshua L; Peterson, Marc et al. (2015) Spatial-temporal modeling of neighborhood sociodemographic characteristics and food stores. Am J Epidemiol 181:137-50
Hoffman, Kate; Vieira, Veronica M; Daniels, Julie L (2014) Brief report: diminishing geographic variability in autism spectrum disorders over time? J Autism Dev Disord 44:712-8
Reyes, Jeanette M; Serre, Marc L (2014) An LUR/BME framework to estimate PM2.5 explained by on road mobile and stationary sources. Environ Sci Technol 48:1736-44
Warren, Joshua L; Luben, Thomas J; Sanders, Alison P et al. (2014) An evaluation of metrics for assessing maternal exposure to agricultural pesticides. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol 24:497-503
Steiner, Anne Z; Pritchard, David A; Young, Steven L et al. (2014) Peri-implantation intercourse lowers fecundability. Fertil Steril 102:178-82
Hoffman, Kate; Daniels, Julie L; Stapleton, Heather M (2014) Urinary metabolites of organophosphate flame retardants and their variability in pregnant women. Environ Int 63:169-72

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