The goal of this application is to maintain continued support for four highly qualified predoctoral candidates committed to innovative research careers in the area of nutrition and cardiometabolic disorders. Opportunities for training are available in basic science, clinical interventions, and gene-environment cohort studies, with emphasis on the translational nature of the work. Cardiovascular diseases alone account for over 1/3 of all deaths in the U.S., with minority populations carrying a disproportionally high burden. Scientists who are trained across disciplines, particularly in those that have a translational component at the intersection of nutrition, functional genomics and cardiometabolic disorders are uniquely qualified to make innovative contributions to this enormous healthcare challenge. For our Training Program, eligible candidates must have been admit- ted to the doctoral program at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University and completed one or two years of coursework, depending on prior training. Candidates must also have demonstrated outstanding academic achievement, identified a dissertation topic in the area of nutrition and cardiometabolic disorders, established their aptitude to conduct research, obtained commitment from a Training Program mentor to serve as their Thesis Advisor, and have stated their career goal to become an independent researcher. Training Program mentors, from multiple divisions across the Tufts University Health Sciences Campus, have demonstrated a strong record in training doctoral students and garnering extramural research support. Critical components of the Training Program include a strong structured didactic curriculum, rich environment of intellectual exchange across the Health Sciences Campus (e.g., laboratory meetings, journal clubs, seminars and university-wide research days), rigorous mentored dissertation research, and comprehensive training in the responsible conduct of research and post-degree survival skills. Training Program administration and trainee supervision is governed by the program's Director and Co-Director, Steering Committee and External Advisory Board. The Director and Co-Director are responsible for the day to day activities of the Training Program, particularly as it relates to individual trainees and mentors. The Steering Committee meets two times per year, and on an 'as needed'basis, and is primarily responsible for selecting trainees, monitoring trainee progress based on programmatic benchmarks, ensuring the quality and breadth of training opportunities, and assuring a robust mentoring program with particular emphasis on facilitating their transition to an in- dependent research career. Additional oversight is provided by an External Advisory Board. We believe the collective training environment of the Health Sciences Campus provides an outstanding opportunity for future researchers in the area of nutrition and cardiometabolic disorders, and that continued support is a worthy in- vestment in the future of cardiometabolic science.

Public Health Relevance

Cardiometabolic disorders affect over half of the U.S. adult population, adding considerably to healthcare costs and disproportionally burdening minority groups. The goal of this application is to maintain continued support for four highly-qualified predoctoral candidates committed to research careers in the area of nutrition and car- diometabolic disorders. Critical components of the Training Program include a strong structured didactic cur- riculum, rich environment of intellectual exchange across the Tufts University Health Sciences Campus, rigor- ous mentored dissertation research, comprehensive training in the responsible conduct of research and post- degree survival skills, and opportunities to conduct research at a translational level.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32HL069772-12
Application #
8705569
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHL1)
Program Officer
Carlson, Drew E
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
12
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Tufts University
Department
Nutrition
Type
Organized Research Units
DUNS #
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02111
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