Because many adverse effects of treatment for childhood cancer may not become clinically apparent until the survivor attains maturity or older ages, continued follow-up across the lifespan, from childhood through adulthood, is essential. With more than 420,000 childhood cancer survivors in the U.S., there is a critical need to accurately characterize the development and manifestation of very late cancer-related sequel. In 2007, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital initiated a unique clinical (i.e., medically evaluated) cohort with the primary aim of establishing lifelong evaluation of health-related and quality of life outcomes in aging adult survivors of pediatric cancer. Eligibility for participatio in the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort (SJLIFE) is survival > 10 years from diagnosis, and attained age of > 18 years. As of January, 2014, 3026 survivors (90 percent of those contacted and 80 percent of those eligible) have successfully completed one or more evaluations (typically involving a 3-4 day outpatient visit) providing a rich repository of biospecimens and outcomes data that has been used to more accurately characterize the prevalence of adverse biomedical and psychosocial outcomes, to identify demographic, genetic, treatment and psychosocial/behavioral-related predictors of negative health outcome, to inform ongoing health surveillance recommendations, and to guide health preserving interventions. The SJLIFE cohort has yielded important findings including determination of a more accurate prevalence of cancer treatment-related organ dysfunction among adults treated for cancer during childhood, investigation of innovative methods of health surveillance, and identification of novel and unexpected late health outcomes. However, the current sample size of the SJLIFE cohort, its restriction to adult participants (i.e., those 18+ years), and methods utilizing risk-directed screening imposes limits on the potential for significant new discovery. Thus, to enhance the SJLIFE cohort and its ability to advance our understanding about how the diagnosis of cancer during childhood and its associated therapeutic exposures impact long-term health, we propose to: (1) expand eligibility of the SJLIFE cohort to include a clinically well-characterized cohort o five- year survivors, (2) undertake uniform medical assessments in all cohort participants, (3) develop and test innovative methodologies to maintain the SJLIFE cohort, and (4) establish a resource for future innovative intervention-based research. Over the five-years of the grant, the SJLIFE cohort will be expanded to include approximately 9800 five-year survivors (i.e., evaluable for late mortality), of whom 7825 are projected to be alive and will agree to actively participate in SJLIFE (i.e., available for longitudinal assessment of morbidity and quality of life outcomes). The SJLIFE cohort will be unique in its ability to provide new insights into the risks and pathophysiology of morbidity associated with cancer and its therapy, which is critical to the design of contemporary treatment protocols and public health initiatives to facilitate survivor access to preventive and remedial services.

Public Health Relevance

With more than 420,000 childhood cancer survivors in the U.S., there is a critical need to accurately characterize the development and manifestation of very late cancer-related outcomes. The St. Jude Lifetime Cohort (SJLIFE) will be unique in its ability to provide new insights into the risks and pathophysiology of morbidity associated with cancer and its therapy, which is critical to the design of contemporary treatment protocols and public health initiatives to facilitate survivor access to preventive and remedial services.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Research Project--Cooperative Agreements (U01)
Project #
1U01CA195547-01
Application #
8884348
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-TCRB-9 (J2))
Program Officer
Elena, Joanne W
Project Start
2015-07-09
Project End
2020-06-30
Budget Start
2015-07-09
Budget End
2016-06-30
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2015
Total Cost
$1,713,483
Indirect Cost
$731,659
Name
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Department
Type
DUNS #
067717892
City
Memphis
State
TN
Country
United States
Zip Code
38105
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Tipirneni-Sajja, Aaryani; Loeffler, Ralf B; Oesingmann, Niels et al. (2016) Measurement of glomerular filtration rate by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a subject-specific two-compartment model. Physiol Rep 4:
Edelmann, Michelle N; Daryani, Vinay M; Bishop, Michael W et al. (2016) Neurocognitive and Patient-Reported Outcomes in Adult Survivors of Childhood Osteosarcoma. JAMA Oncol 2:201-8
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Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Bhakta, Nickhill; Liu, Qi et al. (2016) Absence of Basal Cell Carcinoma in Irradiated Childhood Cancer Survivors of Black Race: A Report from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 25:1356-60
Bhakta, Nickhill; Liu, Qi; Yeo, Frederick et al. (2016) Cumulative burden of cardiovascular morbidity in paediatric, adolescent, and young adult survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma: an analysis from the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study. Lancet Oncol 17:1325-34
Boland, Alexandra M; Gibson, Todd M; Lu, Lu et al. (2016) Dietary Protein Intake and Lean Muscle Mass in Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Report From the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study. Phys Ther 96:1029-38
Wilson, Carmen L; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Jones, Kendra E et al. (2016) Modifiable Factors Associated With Aging Phenotypes Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. J Clin Oncol 34:2509-15
Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Sandlund, John T; Zhang, Nan et al. (2016) Late outcomes of adult survivors of childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma: A report from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study. Pediatr Blood Cancer :
Brinkman, Tara M; Krasin, Matthew J; Liu, Wei et al. (2016) Long-Term Neurocognitive Functioning and Social Attainment in Adult Survivors of Pediatric CNS Tumors: Results From the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study. J Clin Oncol 34:1358-67

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