Targeted cancer drug delivery A dual display phage (T4) system, featuring protein tags externally and packaged protein inside the phage, will be used to deliver therapeutic proteins to cells. The external tags will induce endocytosis through the ICAM pathway. The internalized virus will deliver proteins inside a lysosome, allowing escape through pre-existing protein interactions (toxins that form pores) or poly-lysine residues (the proton sponge effect). We have started constructing such phages beginning this summer. Use of bacteriophage in cancer detection. We have previously developed a method for detecting specific bacterial presence in clinical samples by the use of quantum dot labeled bacteriophage, which is specific for a given bacteria. We are currently developing ways to display on phage wavelength single chain antibody which is specific for binding on a given cancer cell. We will start with single change antibody clone available for Hairy Cell leaukemia. Once constructed we will decorate the same phage with quantum dots using biotinylated peptide that we have developed previously. These phages when bound to cancer cells will make the latter fluorescence.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Investigator-Initiated Intramural Research Projects (ZIA)
Project #
1ZIABC010017-18
Application #
8763049
Study Section
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
18
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$314,397
Indirect Cost
Name
National Cancer Institute Division of Basic Sciences
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
State
Country
Zip Code
Adhya, Sankar; Merril, Carl R; Biswas, Biswajit (2014) Therapeutic and prophylactic applications of bacteriophage components in modern medicine. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med 4:a012518