The foci for this grant application are twofold: advancing the science of symptom management and mentoring the next generation of scientists in symptom management research. The research plan in this grant application is focused on an evaluation of similarities and differences in the trajectories of five common symptoms that occur as a result of cancer and/or its treatments (i.e., pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety). Using novel methods of longitudinal data analysis (i.e., hierarchical linear modeling, growth mixture modeling), the phenotypic and genotypic predictors of each of these symptoms will be evaluated across six NIH-funded studies. The research proposed in this grant application will provide critical information on similarities and differences in the predictors of these common symptoms in oncology patients with a variety of cancer diagnoses, who underwent different cancer treatments, and who are at different stages in their disease trajectory. The mentoring plan in this grant application is designed to educate and train predoctoral students, postdoctoral fellows, clinical and research fellows, and junior and senior faculty members in symptom management research. All of the mentees will be incorporated into the PI's transdisciplinary research team to be able to immerse themselves in symptom management research. Phenotypic and genotypic data from the PI's previous and ongoing studies will be available to these mentees and education and training will be provided on how to utilize newer methods of longitudinal data analysis as well as genomic data to determine the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics that predict higher levels of pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, and anxiety in oncology patients. The knowledge gained from these research and mentorship activities will be used to guide the development of the next generation of symptom management intervention studies.

Public Health Relevance

Patients undergoing treatment for cancer experience symptoms associated with their disease and its treatment. Across all cancer diagnoses and treatments, the most common symptoms that patients experience are pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety. However, recent data from the PI's research team suggest that a large amount of inter-individual variation exists in patients' experiences with these five symptoms. The purposes of this grant application are two-fold. The first is to determine, using data from six completed and ongoing studies what demographic, clinical, and genetic characteristics predict low and high levels of these common symptoms. The second purpose is to educate and train predoctoral students, postdoctoral fellows, clinical and research fellows, and junior and senior faculty members in symptom management research. The knowledge gained from these research and mentorship activities will be used to guide the development of the next generation of symptom management intervention studies. The goal of this research is to decrease symptom severity in oncology patients which will result in improvements in functional status and quality of life.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Research Scientist Award (K05)
Project #
5K05CA168960-05
Application #
9304003
Study Section
Subcommittee I - Transistion to Independence (NCI)
Program Officer
Perkins, Susan N
Project Start
2013-08-06
Project End
2019-07-31
Budget Start
2017-08-01
Budget End
2019-07-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2017
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of California San Francisco
Department
Other Health Professions
Type
Schools of Nursing
DUNS #
094878337
City
San Francisco
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
94118
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