Dr. Elise Riley is an Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Trained as an epidemiologist, she has co-mentored 17 junior investigators and developed a longstanding multidisciplinary research program focused on HIV, drug use, health status and the use of health services in very low-income populations. She is currently funded by NIDA to conduct a homeless women's health study regarding the influences of HIV and polydrug use on cardiac injury. Here she proposes an expansion of the parent study to include two new biomarker outcomes, which will provide a better understanding of cardiac dysfunction through the consideration of multiple physiological pathways. Within this expanded body of research, Dr. Riley further proposes the concurrent augmentation of her mentoring activities for early career clinicians and trainees. The proposed activities leverage existing infrastructure, data and collaborations provided by Dr. Riley's current program, as well as additional NIH and UCSF resources. Collectively they will provide multiple opportunities for career development, a strong mentoring program for patient-oriented researchers and new projects that focus on understanding co-occurring exposures and health conditions to better inform health care delivery in highly vulnerable populations.

Public Health Relevance

Poor health status and premature death among homeless women is due to a variety of complex and overlapping factors. A current NIDA-funded study led by Dr. Riley considers how combinations of drugs and medications exacerbate cardiac injury and poor health. The objective of the current proposal is to expand the existing research to consider additional physiological pathways of cardiac dysfunction, and augment mentoring activities alongside the research. This comprehensive program will provide an effective training environment for mentees conducting patient-oriented research. At the same time, it will facilitate the development of clinical tools for risk assessment to reduce cardiac dysfunction and poor health among homeless women.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Type
Midcareer Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research (K24)
Project #
5K24DA039780-05
Application #
9716577
Study Section
AIDS Clinical Studies and Epidemiology Study Section (ACE)
Program Officer
Mandler, Raul N
Project Start
2015-07-01
Project End
2020-06-30
Budget Start
2019-07-01
Budget End
2020-06-30
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2019
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of California San Francisco
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
094878337
City
San Francisco
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
94118
Christopoulos, Katerina A; Riley, Elise D; Carrico, Adam W et al. (2018) A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Text Messaging Intervention to Promote Virologic Suppression and Retention in Care in an Urban Safety-Net Human Immunodeficiency Virus Clinic: The Connect4Care Trial. Clin Infect Dis 67:751-759
Meacham, Meredith C; Bahorik, Amber L; Shumway, Martha et al. (2018) Condomless Sex and Psychiatric Comorbidity in the Context of Constrained Survival Choices: A Longitudinal Study Among Homeless and Unstably Housed Women. AIDS Behav :
Carrico, Adam W; Flentje, Annesa; Kober, Kord et al. (2018) Recent stimulant use and leukocyte gene expression in methamphetamine users with treated HIV infection. Brain Behav Immun 71:108-115
Carrico, Adam W; Cherenack, Emily M; Roach, Margaret E et al. (2018) Substance-associated elevations in monocyte activation among methamphetamine users with treated HIV infection. AIDS 32:767-771
Meacham, Meredith C; Ramo, Danielle E; Kral, Alex H et al. (2018) Associations between medical cannabis and other drug use among unstably housed women. Int J Drug Policy 52:45-51
Brown, Rebecca T; Hemati, Kaveh; Riley, Elise D et al. (2017) Geriatric Conditions in a Population-Based Sample of Older Homeless Adults. Gerontologist 57:757-766
Riley, Elise D; Hsue, Priscilla Y; Vittinghoff, Eric et al. (2017) Higher prevalence of detectable troponin I among cocaine-users without known cardiovascular disease. Drug Alcohol Depend 172:88-93
Flentje, Annesa; Shumway, Martha; Wong, Lauren H et al. (2017) Psychiatric Risk in Unstably Housed Sexual Minority Women: Relationship between Sexual and Racial Minority Status and Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Psychiatric Diagnoses. Womens Health Issues 27:294-301
van Wijk, Xander M R; Vittinghoff, Eric; Wu, Alan H B et al. (2017) Cocaine use is associated with a higher prevalence of elevated ST2 concentrations. Clin Biochem 50:791-793
Kim, Jin E; Flentje, Annesa; Tsoh, Janice Y et al. (2017) Cigarette Smoking among Women Who Are Homeless or Unstably Housed: Examining the Role of Food Insecurity. J Urban Health 94:514-524

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