The primary objective of the Zebrafish Facility is to support researchers using zebrafish to study vertebrate genefics, genomics, and development by employing expert husbandry techniques, supplying efficient and fimely services, and fostering a helpful, cooperative environment. This Core accomplishes these goals by providing the following services: (1) husbandry and feeding of adult fish, (2) husbandry and rearing of embryos and larvae, (3) provision of staged embryos, (4) sperm cryopreservation, (5) database tracking of all fish stocks and frozen sperm, (6) high through-put quaranfined screening for mutafions in fish from other facilities, (7) procedure rooms and equipment for embryo microinjecfion, and (8) advice and training on fish husbandry and facility set-up. Because our Zebrafish Facility has recently been expanded to provicle more procedure space, we are now adding a new services to the Zebrafish Facility, derivafion and maintenance of germ-free embryos and larvae.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01HD022486-27
Application #
8737031
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1-DSR-Y)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-07-01
Budget End
2015-06-30
Support Year
27
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$304,132
Indirect Cost
$94,386
Name
University of Oregon
Department
Type
DUNS #
948117312
City
Eugene
State
OR
Country
United States
Zip Code
97403
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Parthasarathy, Raghuveer (2018) Monitoring microbial communities using light sheet fluorescence microscopy. Curr Opin Microbiol 43:31-37
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Dona, Margo; Slijkerman, Ralph; Lerner, Kimberly et al. (2018) Usherin defects lead to early-onset retinal dysfunction in zebrafish. Exp Eye Res 173:148-159

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