This subproject is one of many research subprojects utilizing the resources provided by a Center grant funded by NIH/NCRR. The subproject and investigator (PI) may have received primary funding from another NIH source, and thus could be represented in other CRISP entries. The institution listed is for the Center, which is not necessarily the institution for the investigator. The ultimate goal of our work is to understand how the brain functions. To do this, we study the output (motor) portions, using the oculomotor system as a model. Specifically we study those fast movements known as saccadic eye movements. We continue our studies of mechanisms of saccade generation and have recently focused on the function of the caudal Fastigial nucleus (cFN). These studies represent a new direction for us and are still in early stages so no new publications have resulted in the current fiscal year. They consist of 3 related investigations to test whether the cFN is essential to the production of normal saccades. Our anticipated results will change fundamentally the way that we think saccades are produced. Not only will they improve our understanding of oculomotor processes but they may provide a new model for cerebellar function.They will not only advance our understanding of how the brain processes information in order to formulate actions based on that information, but they are also basic to the differential neurological diagnosis based on eye-movement signs now commonly used clinically. They also provide a foundation for studies of more complex aspects of central nervous system function such as interactions between motor systems (e.g., eye and head during orientation) or sensory and motor systems (e.g., the visual and oculomotor systems) and more abstract functions such as attention.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
Type
Primate Research Center Grants (P51)
Project #
5P51RR000166-48
Application #
7958840
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRR1-CM-8 (02))
Project Start
2009-05-01
Project End
2010-04-30
Budget Start
2009-05-01
Budget End
2010-04-30
Support Year
48
Fiscal Year
2009
Total Cost
$157,594
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Washington
Department
Type
Other Domestic Higher Education
DUNS #
605799469
City
Seattle
State
WA
Country
United States
Zip Code
98195
Pham, Amelie; Carrasco, Marisa; Kiorpes, Lynne (2018) Endogenous attention improves perception in amblyopic macaques. J Vis 18:11
Zanos, Stavros; Rembado, Irene; Chen, Daofen et al. (2018) Phase-Locked Stimulation during Cortical Beta Oscillations Produces Bidirectional Synaptic Plasticity in Awake Monkeys. Curr Biol 28:2515-2526.e4
Choi, Hannah; Pasupathy, Anitha; Shea-Brown, Eric (2018) Predictive Coding in Area V4: Dynamic Shape Discrimination under Partial Occlusion. Neural Comput 30:1209-1257
Shushruth, S; Mazurek, Mark; Shadlen, Michael N (2018) Comparison of Decision-Related Signals in Sensory and Motor Preparatory Responses of Neurons in Area LIP. J Neurosci 38:6350-6365
Raghanti, Mary Ann; Edler, Melissa K; Stephenson, Alexa R et al. (2018) A neurochemical hypothesis for the origin of hominids. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 115:E1108-E1116
Wool, Lauren E; Crook, Joanna D; Troy, John B et al. (2018) Nonselective Wiring Accounts for Red-Green Opponency in Midget Ganglion Cells of the Primate Retina. J Neurosci 38:1520-1540
Hasegawa, Yu; Curtis, Britni; Yutuc, Vernon et al. (2018) Microbial structure and function in infant and juvenile rhesus macaques are primarily affected by age, not vaccination status. Sci Rep 8:15867
Oleskiw, Timothy D; Nowack, Amy; Pasupathy, Anitha (2018) Joint coding of shape and blur in area V4. Nat Commun 9:466
Eberle, R; Jones-Engel, L (2017) Understanding Primate Herpesviruses. J Emerg Dis Virol 3:
McAdams, Ryan M; McPherson, Ronald J; Kapur, Raj P et al. (2017) Focal Brain Injury Associated with a Model of Severe Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy in Nonhuman Primates. Dev Neurosci 39:107-123

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