The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive and multidimensional set of measures to assess religiousness in later life. In particular, the proposed research has the following objectives: 1) To conduct a series of focus groups, in-depth interviews, and cognitive interviews in order to identify the content domain of religion as it is lived by older adults; 2) To use the data obtained from these qualitative methods to craft closed-ended survey items to measure religion; 3) To conduct a random community survey that will provide data for a state-of-the- art confirmatory factor analytic assessment of the newly devised indicators; 4) To examine the potential impact of the newly created religion items on health and well-being; and 5) To pay particular attention to differences in the way that religiousness is experienced, expressed, and measured in groups consisting of older whites and elderly African Americans.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01AG014749-04
Application #
6168964
Study Section
Human Development and Aging Subcommittee 3 (HUD)
Program Officer
Nielsen, Lisbeth
Project Start
1997-09-30
Project End
2003-06-30
Budget Start
2000-08-01
Budget End
2003-06-30
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2000
Total Cost
$309,256
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Michigan Ann Arbor
Department
Miscellaneous
Type
Schools of Public Health
DUNS #
791277940
City
Ann Arbor
State
MI
Country
United States
Zip Code
48109
Assari, Shervin (2017) Race, sense of control over life, and short-term risk of mortality among older adults in the United States. Arch Med Sci 13:1233-1240
Assari, Shervin (2016) Gender differences in the predictive role of self-rated health on short-term risk of mortality among older adults. SAGE Open Med 4:2050312116666975
Assari, Shervin; Moghani Lankarani, Maryam (2016) Race and Gender Differences in Correlates of Death Anxiety Among Elderly in the United States. Iran J Psychiatry Behav Sci 10:e2024
Hayward, R David; Krause, Neal (2016) Forms of Attrition in a Longitudinal Study of Religion and Health in Older Adults and Implications for Sample Bias. J Relig Health 55:50-66
Krause, Neal (2015) Assessing the religious roots of volunteer work in middle and late life. Res Aging 37:439-63
Krause, Neal (2015) Religious doubt, helping others, and psychological well-being. J Relig Health 54:745-58
Krause, Neal (2015) Assessing the relationships among race, religion, humility, and self-forgiveness: A longitudinal investigation. Adv Life Course Res 24:66-74
Krause, Neal; Hayward, R David (2014) Hostility, religious involvement, gratitude, and self-rated health in late life. Res Aging 36:731-52
Hayward, R David; Krause, Neal (2014) How religious doubt moderates depression symptoms following older adult bereavement. Death Stud 38:217-23
Krause, Neal (2014) Exploring the relationships among humility, negative interaction in the church, and depressed affect. Aging Ment Health 18:970-9

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