This proposal seeks to advance our understanding of the role of psychosocial and environmental health risk factors as well as medical care in understanding the large socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in health and the way health changes with age in our society. It does so by proposing to extend to four waves and 15 years of follow-up an ongoing prospective study (known as Americans' Changing Lives) of a nationally representative sample of 3,617 adults aged 25 and over in the coterminous United States, who were first interviewed in 1986, with reinterviews of about 83 percent of the surviving members of the original sample already completed in 1989 and 1994, along with ongoing mortality ascertainment on the full original 1986 sample. A proposed fourth wave would be collected on about 83 percent of the surviving sample (estimated respondents - 2,300 of about 2,800 survivors) in 2001, primarily by telephone and in person as necessary, with mortality ascertainment continuing indefinitely and the hope and intent of reinterviewing surviving respondents again about 20-22.5 years after the baseline interview. The ongoing ACL study has generated a large body of publications both by staff of the ACL project and users of the public use data sets for the first two waves (with the third wave to be archived for public use by the end of 1999). ACL analyses and publications have illuminated to the role of a broad range of psychosocial factors, ranging from health behaviors through stress and adaptive resources to productive activities, in predicting health, changes in health and mortality, and in mediating or explaining socioeconomic differences in health. It has also played a major role in understanding the nature, causes, and consequences of paid and unpaid productive activities over the lifecourse. The proposed continuation and extension of the ACL project will address a number of aims: (1) continuing and enhancing ongoing analysis by extending prospective follow-up to 15 years, allowing for better analysis of- (a) time- varying covariates, (b) the impact of changes in risk factors on changes in health, and (c) potential reciprocal relationships between and among SES, psychosocial risk factors and health; (2) enhancing and improving the measurement of a number of variables already being considered in ongoing analysis, including SES (e.g., improving assessment of wealth), productive activities, religious beliefs and behaviors, and personality or dispositional factors (e.g., hostility, optimism, hopelessness, and John Henryism); (3) adding new measures to ACL 4 or (via archival data) to all waves of data for both medical care and exposures in physical and social environments; and (4) to undertake more focused analysis of racial/ethnic differences in health and explanations of them.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
1R01AG018418-01
Application #
6191289
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-SNEM-3 (01))
Program Officer
Elias, Jeffrey W
Project Start
2000-08-01
Project End
2003-06-30
Budget Start
2000-08-01
Budget End
2001-06-30
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2000
Total Cost
$626,069
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Michigan Ann Arbor
Department
Biostatistics & Other Math Sci
Type
Organized Research Units
DUNS #
791277940
City
Ann Arbor
State
MI
Country
United States
Zip Code
48109
Leggett, Amanda; Assari, Shervin; Burgard, Sarah et al. (2017) The Effect of Sleep Disturbance on the Association between Chronic Medical Conditions and Depressive Symptoms Over Time. Longit Life Course Stud 8:138-151
Leggett, Amanda; Clarke, Philippa; Zivin, Kara et al. (2017) Recent Improvements in Cognitive Functioning Among Older U.S. Adults: How Much Does Increasing Educational Attainment Explain? J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci :
Latham-Mintus, Kenzie; Clarke, Philippa J (2017) Linking Mastery Across the Life Course to Mobility Device Use in Later Life. J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci :
Ailshire, Jennifer; Karraker, Amelia; Clarke, Philippa (2017) Neighborhood social stressors, fine particulate matter air pollution, and cognitive function among older U.S. adults. Soc Sci Med 172:56-63
Assari, Shervin; Sonnega, Amanda; Pepin, Renee et al. (2017) Residual Effects of Restless Sleep over Depressive Symptoms on Chronic Medical Conditions: Race by Gender Differences. J Racial Ethn Health Disparities 4:59-69
Moghani Lankarani, Maryam; Assari, Shervin (2017) Diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and long-term risk of renal disease mortality: Racial and socioeconomic differences. J Diabetes Investig 8:590-599
Burgard, Sarah A; Seelye, Sarah (2017) Histories of Perceived Job Insecurity and Psychological Distress Among Older U.S. Adults. Soc Ment Health 7:21-35
Assari, Shervin (2017) Neuroticism Predicts Subsequent Risk of Major Depression for Whites but Not Blacks. Behav Sci (Basel) 7:
Moazen-Zadeh, Ehsan; Assari, Shervin (2016) Depressive Symptoms Predict Major Depressive Disorder after 15 Years among Whites but Not Blacks. Front Public Health 4:13
Assari, Shervin; Lankarani, Maryam Moghani (2016) Race and Urbanity Alter the Protective Effect of Education but not Income on Mortality. Front Public Health 4:100

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