Osteopathic lymphatic pump treatments (LPT) have been advocated for the treatment of infectious disease, and in particular pneumonia, but with no firm scientific foundation. Our preliminary experiments have shown that LPT increases thoracic duct lymph flow and leukocyte concentrations in both rats and dogs. Thus, these initial results support our hypothesis that LPT increases the mobilization and redistribution of leukocyte pools, which may enhance immune surveillance and strengthen host defenses against infection. The proposed investigation will test this hypothesis by accomplishing the following Specific Aims: 1) Determine the tissue source of leukocytes released into lymph and blood during LPT, 2) Determine the distribution of LPT-mobilized leukocytes in peripheral tissues, and 3) Determine if LPT enhances immunity and protection against pulmonary infection. The experiments in Specific Aims 1 and 2 will be conducted in both conscious and anesthetized surgically instrumented dogs. The experiments described in Specific Aim 3 will be conducted in rats. Thoracic duct lymph flow will be measured with an implanted transducer and sampled through an indwelling catheter. Lymph and blood will be collected to determine the regional release of leukocytes and their uptake from blood during LPT. The contribution of the spleen and mucosal tissue will be determined by in situ fluorescently labeling of tissues. Reappearance of labeled leukocytes in lymph will index the repopulation rate of lymph sources sensitive to LPT. Measurements of the rate of appearance and disappearance of leukocytes in blood will be made to determine 1) if leukocytes are released directly into the circulation, particularly from the spleen and gut associated lymphoid tissues, and if LPT may increases this release, and 2) if LPT enhances the return of mobilized leukocytes to tissues. To determine if LPT enhances immunity and protection against pneumonia, rats will be nasally infected with Streptococcus pneumoinae bacteria. We hypothesize that rats receiving LPT will have reduced lung bacteria. To quantify and characterize leukocytes in lymph, blood and tissue, the following analyses and procedures will be used: differential cell counts, flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), enumeration of antibody forming cells by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT), and fluorescent labeling of leukocytes. The information gained from this novel investigation will provide a robust scientific basis and rationale for the use of LPT to enhance immunity and treat infection. In addition, this new information will expand basic understanding of the lymphatic system and its role in immunological function. PUBLIC HEALTH REVELANCE: In this proposal we will test the hypothesis that LPT increases the mobilization and redistribution of leukocyte pools, which would enhance immune surveillance and strengthen host defenses against infection. The information gained from this novel investigation will provide a robust scientific basis and rationale for the use of LPT to enhance immunity and treat infection. In addition, this new information will expand basic understanding of the lymphatic system and its role in immunological function.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01AT004361-02
Application #
7743004
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAT1-SM (10))
Program Officer
Pontzer, Carol H
Project Start
2009-01-01
Project End
2012-12-31
Budget Start
2010-01-01
Budget End
2010-12-31
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2010
Total Cost
$356,400
Indirect Cost
Name
University of North Texas
Department
Physical Medicine & Rehab
Type
Other Domestic Higher Education
DUNS #
110091808
City
Fort Worth
State
TX
Country
United States
Zip Code
76107
Hodge, Lisa M; Creasy, Caitlin; Carter, KiahRae et al. (2015) Lymphatic pump treatment as an adjunct to antibiotics for pneumonia in a rat model. J Am Osteopath Assoc 115:306-16
Creasy, Caitlin; Schander, Artur; Orlowski, Ashley et al. (2013) Thoracic and abdominal lymphatic pump techniques inhibit the growth of S. pneumoniae bacteria in the lungs of rats. Lymphat Res Biol 11:183-6
Schander, Artur; Padro, David; King, Hollis H et al. (2013) Lymphatic pump treatment repeatedly enhances the lymphatic and immune systems. Lymphat Res Biol 11:219-26
Hodge, Lisa M (2012) Osteopathic lymphatic pump techniques to enhance immunity and treat pneumonia. Int J Osteopath Med 15:13-21
Schander, Artur; Downey, H Fred; Hodge, Lisa M (2012) Lymphatic pump manipulation mobilizes inflammatory mediators into lymphatic circulation. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 237:58-63
Hodge, Lisa M; Downey, H Fred (2011) Lymphatic pump treatment enhances the lymphatic and immune systems. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 236:1109-15
Hodge, Lisa M; Bearden, Melissa K; Schander, Artur et al. (2010) Lymphatic pump treatment mobilizes leukocytes from the gut associated lymphoid tissue into lymph. Lymphat Res Biol 8:103-10
Huff, Jamie B; Schander, Artur; Downey, H Fred et al. (2010) Lymphatic pump treatment augments lymphatic flux of lymphocytes in rats. Lymphat Res Biol 8:183-7