To assess relationships between changes in adiposity, sex hormones, lipids, lipoproteins, and apolipoproteins, we will quantitate plasma lipids, lipoprotein cholesterols, apolipoproteins, testosterone, estradiol, height and weight every six months for 3 years in 240 black and 240 white males 12-15 years of age at intake. These subjects will be randomly selected from a representative school population. We will also conduct these longitudinal studies in 240 12-15 years old male offspring of parents with premature coronary heart disease (CHD), myocardial infarction and/or coronary bypass surgery Less than or equal to 55 years of age. Recent studies by ourselves and others have shown that 1) offspring of patients with premature heart disease have lipid, lipoprotein, and apolipoprotein profiles placing them at increased future risk to CHD; 2) that lipid, lipoprotein, and apolipoprotein profiles differ in black and white males, with black males having higher HDLC and apoA1, and lower triglycerides; 3) significant decreases in HDLC occur during sexual maturations, primarily related to complex interactions between testosterone, estradiol, and ponderosity; 4) sex hormone profiles in males with early CHD differ from those in healthy controls; and 5) mean estrogen levels in obese males are significantly greater than in non-obese males. These longitudinal studies in a biracial population of 12-15 year old students and offspring of parents with premature CHD, putatively at increased risk to CHD themselves, will permit an assessment of adolescent changes in lipid profiles and relationships of these changes to sex hormones in normal and high risk adolescent males.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01HD018281-02
Application #
3315306
Study Section
Epidemiology and Disease Control Subcommittee 3 (EDC)
Project Start
1984-09-01
Project End
1987-08-31
Budget Start
1985-09-01
Budget End
1986-08-31
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
1985
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Cincinnati
Department
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
City
Cincinnati
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
45221
Morrison, John A; Barton, Bruce A; Biro, Frank M et al. (2003) Sex hormones and the changes in adolescent male lipids: longitudinal studies in a biracial cohort. J Pediatr 142:637-42
Morrison, John A; Sprecher, Dennis L; Biro, Frank M et al. (2002) Serum testosterone associates with lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in black and white males, 10 to 15 years of age, through lowered apolipoprotein AI and AII concentrations. Metabolism 51:432-7
Morrison, J A; Sprecher, D L; Biro, F M et al. (2000) Estradiol and testosterone effects on lipids in black and white boys aged 10 to 15 years. Metabolism 49:1124-9
Rice, T; Rankinen, T; Province, M A et al. (2000) Genome-wide linkage analysis of systolic and diastolic blood pressure: the Quebec Family Study. Circulation 102:1956-63
Morrison, J A; Barton, B A; Biro, F M et al. (1999) Overweight, fat patterning, and cardiovascular disease risk factors in black and white boys. J Pediatr 135:451-7
Morrison, J A; Jacobsen, D W; Sprecher, D L et al. (1999) Serum glutathione in adolescent males predicts parental coronary heart disease. Circulation 100:2244-7
Rice, T; Perusse, L; Bouchard, C et al. (1999) Familial aggregation of body mass index and subcutaneous fat measures in the longitudinal Quebec family study. Genet Epidemiol 16:316-34
Borecki, I B; Blangero, J; Rice, T et al. (1998) Evidence for at least two major loci influencing human fatness. Am J Hum Genet 63:831-8
Morrison, J A; Sprecher, D L; Biro, F M et al. (1998) Sex hormones and lipoproteins in adolescent male offspring of parents with premature coronary heart disease and a control group. J Pediatr 133:526-32
Morrison, J A; Barton, B A; Biro, F M et al. (1998) The conjoint trait of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high triglycerides in adolescent black and white males. Metabolism 47:514-21

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