This training grant application proposes the centralization of training postdoctoral candidates interested in a career in brain aging and neurodegenerative disease at NYU Langone Medical Center (NYULMC). There is a critical need to train the next generation of MD and PhD researchers to investigate causes of disorders of brain aging, develop new therapeutics and interventions, and translate these findings from bench to bedside as well as from bedside to community. This application is designed to select four outstanding postdoctoral trainees from a well qualified pool of MD and PhD applicants, develop and implement a comprehensive curriculum and provide 2-years of high quality research training in basic, translational, clinical, and psychosocial research. This Training Program, centered in the Center for Cognitive Neurology (CCN), a school-wide, extradepartmental, multidisciplinary program designed to foster collaborative, translational research. The CCN will serve as the unifying umbrella under which this program will be implemented, sustained and financially supported while providing the infrastructure to guarantee success and supplying the trainees a ?sense of community? and a home-base within NYULMC. The future demand for highly skilled investigators with a proven track-record examining brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases will be substantial as aging-related neurodegenerative disorders continue to increase with an aging population. The training of the next generation of research scientists and research clinicians with expertise in these diseases is and will remain a public health priority in the United States for many years to come. The Institute on Medicine recognized the dearth of junior investigators and clinicians with expertise in geriatrics and gerontology. To date, these calls for increased entrance into aging investigation have been left unanswered. Thus, a strong and compelling rationale exists to consolidate and expand the research-training program for brain aging and neurodegenerative disorders through the support of a T32 training program. To do this we propose the following Specific Aims: 1. Develop research training opportunities for postdoctoral candidates in the area of brain aging and neurodegenerative disease; 2. Educate trainees to fundamentals of brain aging and neurodegenerative disease, rigorous research methodology, clinical approaches, statistical analyses, and the principles of responsible conduct of research.; 3. Provide an interactive, collaborative environment fostering personal and professional growth for clinical, psychosocial, translational and basic science trainees.; and 4. Enhance trainees' requisite skills to gain external funding in the form of K- and R- awards.

Public Health Relevance

This application proposes training postdoctoral MD and PhD candidates interested in a career in brain aging and neurodegenerative disease at NYU Langone Medical Center (NYULMC). There is a critical need to train the next generation of MD and PhD researchers to Investigate causes of disorders of brain aging, develop new therapeutics and interventions, and translate these findings from bench to bedside to the community. This Training Program is centered in the Center for Cognitive Neurology (CCN), a school-wide, extradepartmental, multidisciplinary program designed to foster collaborative, translational research at NYULMC and will train the next generation of research scientists and clinicians with expertise in brain aging and neurodegenerative disease.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32AG052909-04
Application #
9932282
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1)
Program Officer
Wise, Bradley C
Project Start
2017-05-01
Project End
2022-04-30
Budget Start
2020-05-01
Budget End
2021-04-30
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2020
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
New York University
Department
Neurology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
121911077
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10016
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