The Clinical Pharmacology and Analyfical Chemistry (CPAC) Core contains clinical pharmacology expertise with a CLIA-certified laboratory to support clinical and preclinical HIV/AIDS research among CFAR invesfigators at UNC, FHl, and RTI. Since the CPAC Core is the only one of its kind within the CFAR system, it also supports a growing number of invesfigators in other CFARs across the country. The CPAC Core consists of experienced scientists who provide a high level of expertise in trial design, development and validation of analytical methods in complex biological matrices to accurately quantify drug exposure, and interpretation of preclinical and clinical pharmacology data. The CPAC Core also provides leadership in HIV prevention strategies, women's health issues, and international pharmacology, and trains domestic and international investigators in pharmacologic and analytic methods.

Public Health Relevance

A major feature of controlling the HIV epidemic is the complex interplay between drug exposure and response in treatment, prevention, and cure. This is evidenced in the extensive preclinical and early clinical dose-response investigations during drug development. Optimizing effective therapy in any of these areas of the epidemic requires extensive knowledge of exposure targets and pharmacokinefics in multiple body compartments to chose the best doses, dosing frequencies, and drug combinations for efficacy. The CPAC Core provides the necessary resources for CFAR users to optimize their preclinical and clinical research approach.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30AI050410-16
Application #
8531837
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1-ELB-A)
Project Start
2013-08-01
Project End
2016-07-31
Budget Start
2013-08-01
Budget End
2014-07-31
Support Year
16
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$879,623
Indirect Cost
$244,441
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Type
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
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