Despite the high prevalence, morbidity and mortality burden of chronic medical conditions among persons with Serious Mental Illness (SMI), few^ quality measurement protocols provide guidance on the optimal care of these complex patients. Guidelines have generally been developed for the simplest case-a person with only one disease-and it is not clear whether interventions are equally effective in complex populations with multiple medical and behavioral health co-morbidities, socio-economic disparities, or inequities in access to care. There remain substantial gaps in our knowledge about which interventions hold greatest promise for improving the overall health of populations with SMI and co-morbid medical disease;what system re- design wiU be most effective in delivering those interventions;or how treatments for mental illness (e.g. antipsychotics) may modify outcomes for medical conditions (e.g. diabetes). Maine has undertaken significant integrated care initiatives to improve physical and behavioral health outcomes for persons with SMI, including the state-wide implementation in 2013 of Medicaid Health Homes in mental health agencies (HHOPES) that will provide comprehensive care management and chronic disease self management support for consumers with diabetes. In addition to HHOPES implementation, Maine's mental health system is planning an antipsychotic quality improvement project designed to reduce the onset and burden of diabetes in the SMI population This proposed NIMH project will take advantage of Maine's service delivery innovations to develop the research design and infrastructure necessary to support and evaluate the outcomes of these natural experiments. Products wiU include a person-specific dataset linked from multiple data sources;advances in the development of standardized metrics and procedures for analysis of Medicaid, Medicare, vital statistics, and clinical data;and process data on the challenges to implementing these models. In achieving these outcomes, this project wUl expand knowledge about best practices for improving health outcomes of persons with SMI.

Public Health Relevance

; Individuals with Serious Mental Illness (SMI) are at high risk of developing diabetes, and when they do, have poorer outcomes than the general diabetic population. This study will explore health system innovations designed to improve diabetes care management for persons with SMI, and develop the research infrastructure needed to study their impact.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Resource-Related Research Projects (R24)
Project #
1R24MH102765-01
Application #
8633561
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMH1-ERB-I (03))
Program Officer
Azrin, Susan
Project Start
2013-09-26
Project End
2014-09-25
Budget Start
2013-09-26
Budget End
2014-09-25
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$285,600
Indirect Cost
$85,600
Name
University of Southern Maine
Department
None
Type
Other Domestic Higher Education
DUNS #
077469567
City
Portland
State
ME
Country
United States
Zip Code
04104