Project Report

While in Japan, I created a survey to administer to Japanese students in order to examine how they experience failure and the effects of considering close others after that failure. In Japan, people tend to see themselves as interdependent and connected to others; a person cannot be understood without understanding his or her relationship with others. In the United States, people tend to see themselves very differently. There the emphasis is on being an individual, separate from others. A person is understood through his or her internal traits, attributes, and goals. We expect to find then that academic failure in Japan and the United States will be experienced very differently. In Japan, we expect that students will be more likely to consider how a failure may affect those people with whom they are interconnected (e.g., family, classmates), while in the United States we expect that students will be more likely to consider what the failure means about their personal selves. In the survey for Japan, we present undergraduate participants with a vignette prompt in which we describe a student who is experiencing a difficulty and ask participants to imagine that they are in the student’s position. Participants then answer a series of questions aimed at measuring the extent to which they are considering others after the difficult academic experience or themselves. We also plan to run a version of this study in the United States. We expect to find that Japanese students will be more likely to consider others after the academic failure compared to the European American students.

Agency
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Institute
Office of International and Integrative Activities (IIA)
Application #
1108576
Program Officer
Carter Kimsey
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2011-06-01
Budget End
2012-05-31
Support Year
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$700
Indirect Cost
Name
Fu Alyssa
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Sunnyvale
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
90487